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What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World by Jon Young
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“If we learn to read the birds-and their behaviors and vocalizations-through them, we can read the world at large... if we replace collision with connection, learn to read these details, feel at home, relax, and are respectful--ultimately the birds will yield to us the first rite of passage: a close encounter with an animal otherwise wary of our presence.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“As awareness grows, appreciation grows too. As appreciation grows, so does empathy.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“When I was growing up under Tom's (Tom Brown, the Tracker) watchful gaze, I often wondered why he seemed so distant and quiet so much of the time. This was why. He was stilling the chatter, quieting his mind, connecting and listening: practicing the routine of invisibility.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“Eons ago, Homo sapiens were just as alert and aware as all other creatures, and for the same reason. They needed to be. Now we don't need to be - or do we, but just don't understand this anymore? Our sensory equipment and brains are still designed for this awareness. These instincts are still in each of us, just buried, maybe deeply buried. Connecting with bird language begins the process of unearthing them.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“In a culture in which "connection" usually refers to the strength of the cell phone signal, quieting the mind - even just sitting alone in the backyard, much less in the forest - can be a difficult rite of passage.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“...when we "lose our mind" and "come to our senses" in the fullest possible way, the chattering, texting, e-mailing, twittering mind will eventually quiet down and almost silence itself. This is a sacred and connected silence...It's like a deep, still pond reflecting the stars of the night sky. I believe this is the baseline for human consciousness, and I'm convinced that the birds are the best mentors in the natural world for bringing us to it.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“Listening to Spanish, Italian, or German opera, you, like me, may have no idea what the words of a particular aria mean, but you don't need this knowledge to understand the feeling they convey. You can tell if it's a song of pleasure, jubilation, triumph, or tragedy.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“...have you ever seen a mother robin in her territorial mode? I watched one brutalize another female robin, then a minute later strike a hard blow to the back of a considerably larger Steller's Jay...Generally speaking, and again from my observations, most males of most species are actually fairly low-key and oriented toward to the idea of defense through song and display and, if necessary, scuffling. Progecting chicks in the nest, a female will be quick to drive away anyone deemed an intruder, and without much fanfare They're more direct and seem tougher to me. They go for the jugular, almost literally. As another bird, I'd much rather deal with a male.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World
“Bird language is about acquiring some "jungle etiquette," and the sit spot is where this starts to happen...Instead of flushing out the wrens and chickadees and robins and sparrows with a major bird plow, Jack learned to sit quietly and watch, listen, learn and connect.”
Jon Young, What the Robin Knows: How Birds Reveal the Secrets of the Natural World