Pale Blue Dot Quotes

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Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space by Carl Sagan
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Pale Blue Dot Quotes Showing 91-120 of 110
“The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“How is it that hardly any major religion has looked at science and said, 'This is better than we thought! The universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant. God must be even greater than we dreamed'?”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“You spend even a little time contemplating the Earth from orbit and the most deeply engrained nationalisms begin to erode. They seem the squabbles of mites on a plum.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“As children, we fear the dark. Anything might be out. here. The unknown troubles us. Ironically, it is our fate to live in the dark. This unexpected finding of science is only about three centuries old. Head out from the Earth in any direction you choose, and—after an initial flash of blue and a longer wait while the Sun fades—you are surrounded by blackness, punctuated only here and there by the faint and distant stars. Even after we are grown, the darkness retains its power to frighten us. And so there are those who say we should not inquire too closely into who else might be living in that darkness. Better not to know, they say. There are 400 billion stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Of this immense multitude, could it be that our humdrum Sun is the only one with an inhabited planet? Maybe. Maybe the origin of life or intelligence is exceedingly improbable. Or maybe civilizations arise all the time, but wipe themselves out as soon as they are able. Or, here and there, peppered across space, orbiting other suns, maybe there are worlds something like our own, on which other beings gaze up and wonder as we do about who else lives in the dark…Life is a comparative rarity. You can survey dozens of worlds and find that on only one of them does life arise and evolve and persist… If we humans ever go to these worlds, then, it will be because a nation or a consortium of them believes it to be to its advantage—or to the advantage of the human species… In our time we’ve crossed the Solar System and sent four ships to the stars… But we continue to search for inhabitants. We can’t help it. Life looks for life.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“But for us, it's different. Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.
The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, ever king and
peasant, every young couple in love, every moth and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“But if the Bible is not everywhere literally true, which parts are divinely inspired and which are merely fallible and human? As soon as we admit that there are scriptural mistakes (or concessions to the ignorance of the times), then how can the Bible be an inerrant guide to ethics and morals?”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Una científica compañera mía me contaba un reciente viaje que realizó a la meseta de Nueva Guinea, donde visitó una tribu todavía en la edad de piedra que apenas había tenido contactos con la civilización. Ignoraban lo que son los relojes de pulsera, las bebidas refrescantes y los alimentos congelados. Pero conocían el Apolo 11. Sabían que los humanos han pisado la Luna.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Vast migrations of people—some voluntary, most not—have shaped the human condition. More of us flee from war, oppression, and famine today than at any other time in human history. As the Earth’s climate changes in the coming decades, there are likely to be far greater numbers of environmental refugees. Better places will always call to us. Tides of people will continue to ebb and flow across the planet. But the lands we run to now have already been settled. Other people, often unsympathetic to our plight, are there before us. *”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“On the scale of worlds—to say nothing of stars or galaxies—humans are inconsequential, a thin film of life on an obscure and solitary lump of rock and metal. It”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Nuestro planeta y nuestro sistema solar se hallan rodeados por un nuevo mundo oceánico, las profundidades del espacio. Y no es más infranqueable que el de otras épocas.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot
“إننا وافدون جدد، ونعيش في الأرياف الكونية، لقد نشأنا من الميكروبات والوحل. القردة أعمامنا وأفكارنا ومشاعرنا ليست تحت سيطرتنا بالكامل، وقد توجد كائنات أذكى منا وتختلف عنا تماماً وعلى رأس ذلك كله، فإننا نحيل كوكبنا إلى حالة من الفوضى ونصبح مصدر خطر على أنفسنا.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“And after the Earth dies, some 5 billion years from now, after it is burned t a crisp or even swallowed by the Sun, there will be other worlds and stars and galaxies coming into being- and they will know nothing of a place once called Earth”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“We are too small and our statecraft is too feeble to be seen by a spacecraft between the Earth and the Moon. From this vantage point, our obsession with nationalism is nowhere in evidence.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Tides of people will continue to ebb and flow across the planet. But the lands we run to now have already been settled. Other people, often unsympathetic to our plight, are there before us.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“The emerging picture of the early Solar System does not resemble a stately progression of events designed to form the Earth. Instead, it looks as if our planet was made, and survived, by mere lucky chance,* amid unbelievable violence. Our world does not seem to have been sculpted by a master craftsman. Here too, there is no hint of a Universe made for us.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly and compassionately with one another and to preserve and cherish that pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Would you say, “Billy, be home by the time the Earth has rotated enough so as to occult the Sun below the local horizon”? Billy would be long gone before you’re finished.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Al parecer anhelamos un privilegio, merecido no por nuestros esfuerzos, sino por nacimiento, digamos que por el mero hecho de ser humanos y de haber nacido en la Tierra. Podríamos llamarla la noción antropocéntrica, <>.

Está noción alcanza su culminación en la idea de que fuimos creados a imagen y semejanza de Dios: <> El filósofo griego del siglo VI a. J.C. Jenófanes comprendió la arrogancia de esta perspectiva:

<”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“Al parecer anhelamos un privilegio, merecido no por nuestros esfuerzos, sino por nacimiento, digamos que por el mero hecho de ser humanos y de haber nacido en la Tierra. Podríamos llamarla la noción antropocéntrica, "centrada en el ser humano".

Está noción alcanza su culminación en la idea de que fuimos creados a imagen y semejanza de Dios: "El Creador y Gobernador de todo el universo es precisamente como yo. ¡Caramba, qué coincidencia! ¡Qué adecuado y satisfactorio!" El filósofo griego del siglo VI a. J.C. Jenófanes comprendió la arrogancia de esta perspectiva:

Los etíopes plasman a sus dioses negros y de nariz respingona; los tracianos dicen de los suyos que tienen los ojos azules y el pelo rojo... Sí, y si bueyes, caballos o leones tuvieran manos y pudieran pintar con ellas, y producir obras de arte como los hombres, los caballos pintarían a sus dioses con forma de caballo, los bueyes con forma de buey...”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space
“It is now almost possible to assign color combinations, based on the colors of clouds and sky, to every planet in the Solar System—from the sulfur-stained skies of Venus and the rusty skies of Mars to the aquamarine of Uranus and the hypnotic and unearthly blue of Neptune. Sacre-jaunt, sacre-rouge, sacre-vert. Perhaps they will one day adorn the flags of distant human outposts in the Solar System, in that time when the new frontiers are sweeping out from the Sun to the stars, and the explorers are surrounded by the endless black of space. Sacre-noir.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

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