Anatomy of an Illness Quotes

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Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient by Norman Cousins
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“Each patient carries his own doctor inside him.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness
“I have learned never to underestimate the capacity of the human mind and body to regenerate -- even when prospects seem most wretched. The life force may be the least understood force on earth." Norman Cousins (in his; Anatomy of an Illness)”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient
“Some people don't really know enough to make a pronouncement of doom on a human being.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness
“If ignorance about the nature of pain is widespread, ignorance about the way pain-killing drugs is even more so. What is not generally understood is that many of the vaunted pain-killing drugs conceal the pain without correcting the underlying condition. They deaden the mechanism in the body that alerts the brain to the fact that something may be wrong. The body can pay a high price for suppression of pain without regard to its basic cause.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient
“Suppose I stopped taking aspirin and phenylbutazone? What about the pain? The bones in my spine and practically every joint in my body felt as though I had been run over by a truck.
I knew that pain could be affected by attitudes. Most people become panicky about almost any pain. On all sides they have been so bombarded with advertisements about pain that they take this or that analgesic at the slightest sign of an ache. We are largely illiterate about pain and so are seldom able to deal with it rationally. Pain is part of the body's magic. It is the way the body transmits a sign to the body that something is wrong.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient
“Illness is always an interaction between [mind and body]. It can begin in the mind and affect the body, or it can begin in the body and affect the mind, both of which are served by the same bloodstream. Attempts to treat most mental diseases as though they were completely free of physical causes and attempts to treat most bodily diseases as though the mind were in no way involved must be considered archaic in the light of new evidence about the way the human body functions.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient
“Death is not the ultimate tragedy of life. The ultimate tragedy is depersonalization—dying in an alien and sterile area, separated from the spiritual nourishment that comes from being able to reach out to a loving hand, separated from the desire to experience the things that make life worth living, separated from hope.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient
“Time is the one thing that patients need most from their doctors--time to be heard, time to have things explained, time to reassured, time to be introduced by the doctor personally to specialists or other attendants whose very existence seems to reflect something new and threatening. yet the one thing that too many doctors find most difficult to command or manage is time.”
Norman Cousins, Anatomy of an Illness: As Perceived by the Patient