Seabiscuit Quotes

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Seabiscuit: An American Legend Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand
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Seabiscuit Quotes Showing 1-30 of 30
“His books were the closest thing he had to furniture and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“...maybe it was better to break a man's leg than to break his heart.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“It's easy to talk to a horse if you understand his language. Horses stay the same from the day they are born until the day they die. They are only changed by the way people treat them.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“He had no money and no home; he lived entirely on the road of the racing circuit, sleeping in empty stalls, carrying with him only a saddle, his rosary, and his books....The books were the closest thing he had to furniture, and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.”
laura hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“... character reigns preeminent in determining potential.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“In 1938... the year's #1 newsmaker was not FDR, Hitler, or Mussolini. Nor was it Lou Gehrig or Clark Gable. The subject of the most newspaper column inches in 1938 wasn't even a person. It was an undersized, crooked-legged racehorse named Seabiscuit.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“He (Thomas Smith) believed with complete conviction that no animal was permanently ruined. Every horse could be improved. He lived by a single maxim: 'Learn your horse. Each one is an individual, and once you penetrate his mind and heart, you can often work wonders with an otherwise intractable beast.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“The racehorse, by virtue of his awesome physical gifts, freed the jockey from himself. When a horse and a jockey flew over the track together, there were moments in which the man's mind wedded itself to the animal's body to form something greater than the sum of both parts.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“We had to rebuild him, both mentally and physically, but you don't have to rebuild the heart when it's already there, big as all outdoors.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Old Pops and I have got four good legs between us,” he said. “Maybe that’s enough.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“So long,Charley.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Horses stay the same from the day they are born until the day they die. . . . They are only changed by the way people treat them.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“There's more than one thing I can't do and there are a lot more things than that that you can't do or you wouldn't be in the newspaper business. You'd be a jockey and a scholar and a connoisseur of femininity like I am”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“A Thoroughbred racehorse is one of God's most impressive engines. Tipping the scales at up to 1,450 pounds, he can sustain speeds of forty miles per hour. Equipped with reflexes much faster than those of the most quick-wired man, he swoops over as much as twenty-eight feet of earth in a single stride, and corners on a dime. His body is a paradox of mass and lightness, crafted to slip through air with the ease of an arrow. His mind is impressed with a single command: run. He pursues speed with superlative courage, pushing beyond defeat, beyond exhaustion, sometimes beyond the structural limits of bone and sinew. In flight, he is nature's ultimate wedding of form and purpose.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Man is preoccupied with freedom yet laden with handicaps. The breadth of his activity and experience is narrowed by the limitations of his relatively weak, sluggish body. The racehorse, by virtue of his awesome physical gifts, freed the jockey from himself.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Howard then made Seabiscuit’s entry for the Santa Anita Handicap. He left the jockey space blank.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“We figure he is the people’s horse, and we propose to train him in the open.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“He had a colorless translucence about him that made him seem as if he were in the earliest stages of progressive invisibility.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Who hit you in the butt with a saddle and told you you could ride?" a starter hissed before a race. "The same S.O.B. that hit you in the butt and told you you could start!" he shot back. Pollard had found the one place on earth that could hold his interest. He was broke, hungry, and, according to his sister Edie, "happy as heck.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“The autos alone remained to conquer space.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: The True Story of Three Men and a Racehorse
“So long, Charley.”24 He had coined a phrase that jockeys would use for decades.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“Each of his workouts was attended by ten thousand or more spectators.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“To pilot a racehorse is to ride a half-ton catapult. It is without question one of the most formidable feats in sport.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“alive.3 Johnny found myriad avenues of”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“The grade of Nineteenth Avenue was so daunting for the engines of the day that watching automobiles straining for the top became a local pastime.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“He grasped for hope in Emerson's vision of natural polarities, in which all things are balanced by their opposites—darkness by light, cold by heat, loss by gain.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“The weather was clear, the track fast
War Admiral broke first and finished last.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“If Red breaks that leg again," Howard said soberly, "it will cripple him for life." Alexander told him that maybe it was better to break a man's leg than his heart.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“... the little horse had drawn more newspaper coverage in 1938 than Roosevelt, who was second, Hitler (third), Mussolini (fourth), or any other newsmaker. His match with War Admiral was almost certainly the single biggest news story of the year and one of the biggest sports moments of the century.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend
“The whole country is divided into two camps," wrote Dave Boone in the San Francisco Chronicle. "People who never saw a horse race in their lives are taking sides. If the issue were deferred another week, there would be a civil war between the War Admiral Americans and the Seabiscuit Americans.”
Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit: An American Legend