A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings Quotes

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A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens
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A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings Quotes Showing 1-20 of 20
“Reflect upon your present blessings -- of which every man has many -- not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“It is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas when the Great Creator was a child himself.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“Besides, the kettle was aggravating and obstinate. It wouldn't allow itself to be adjusted on the top bar; it wouldn't hear of accommodating itself kindly to the knobs of coal; it would lean forward with a drunken air and dribble, a very Idiot of a kettle, on the hearth. It was quarrelsome, and hissed and spluttered morosely at the fire. To sum up all, the lid, resisting Mrs. Peerybingle's fingers, first of all turned topsy-turvey, and then with an ingenious pertinacity deserving of a better cause, dived sideways in - down to the very bottom of the kettle. And the hull of the Royal George has never made half the monstrous resistance to coming out of the water, which the lid of that kettle employed against Mrs. Peerybingle, before she got it up again.
It looked sullen and pig-headed enough, even then: carrying its handle with an air of defiance, and cocking its spout pertly and mockingly at Mrs. Peerybingle as if it said, "I won't boil. Nothing shall induce me!”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
tags: humor
“What right have you to be merry? what reason have you to be merry? You're poor enough. Come then, returned the nephew gaily. What right have you to be morose? You're rich enough.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“Shaving was not an easy task, for his hand continued to shake very much; and shaving requires attention, even when you don't dance while you are at it.
But if he had cut the end of his nose off, he would have put a piece of sticking-plaster over it, and been quite satisfied.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“Everybody is, often, as likely to be wrong as right. In the general experience, everybody has been wrong so often, and it has taken in most instances such a weary while to find out how wrong, that the authority is proved to be fallible.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“There are many things from which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited, I dare say, 'Christmas among the rest. But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round -- apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging ti it can be apart from that -- as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“How much longer can I be so fucking cute?”
Margaret Atwood, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“There seems a magic in the very name of Christmas.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“«Natale una fesseria, zio?», disse il nipote di Scrooge; «sono sicuro che non pensi una cosa simile».
«Certo che la penso», disse Scrooge. «Buon Natale! Che diritto hai tu di essere allegro? Che ragione hai tu di essere allegro? Sei povero abbastanza».
«Andiamo, via», rispose allegro il nipote. «Che diritto hai tu di essere triste? Che ragione hai tu di essere scontento? Sei ricco abbastanza».”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Stories: Christmas Festivities, The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton, A Christmas Tree, The Seven Poor Travellers, The Haunted Man, and Master Humphrey's Clock
“«Ci sono molte cose, credo, che possono avermi fatto del bene senza che io ne abbia ricavato un profitto», replicò il nipote, «e Natale è una di queste. Ma sono sicuro che ho sempre considerato il periodo natalizio, quando è venuto — a prescindere dalla venerazione dovuta al suo nome e alla sua origine sacra, ammesso che qualcosa che si riferisca possa esser tenuta separata da questa venerazione — come buono; un periodo di gentilezza, di perdono, di carità, di gioia; l'unico periodo che io conosca, in tutto il lungo calendario di un anno, nel quale uomini e donne sembrano concordi nello schiudere liberamente i cuori serrati e nel pensare alla gente che è al disotto di loro come se si trattasse realmente di compagni nel viaggio verso la tomba, e non di un'altra razza di creature in viaggio verso altre mete. E per questo, zio, anche se il Natale non mi ha mai fatto entrare in tasca una moneta d'oro, e neanche d'argento, credo che mi abbia fatto bene e che mi farà bene, e chiedo che Dio lo benedica».”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Stories: Christmas Festivities, The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton, A Christmas Tree, The Seven Poor Travellers, The Haunted Man, and Master Humphrey's Clock
“A Merry Christmas to us all, my dears. God bless us!” Which all the family re-echoed. “God bless us every one!” said Tiny Tim, the last of all.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“Best and happiest of all, the Time before him was his own, to make amends in!”
Charles Dickens, Christmas Books
“... Within the mind, especially the mind under great stress... boundaries of space and time are meaningless, and the... interior self lives by other rules and in other dimensions.”
Frederick Busch, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“The Grocers'! oh the Grocers'! nearly closed, with perhaps two shutters down, or one; but through those gaps such glimpses! It was not alone that the scales descending on the counter made a merry sound, or that the twine and roller parted company so briskly, or that the canisters were rattled up and down like juggling tricks, or even that the blended scents of tea and coffee were so grateful to the nose, or even that the raisins were so plentiful and rare, the almonds so extremely white, the sticks of cinnamon so long and straight, the other spices so delicious, the candied fruits so caked and spotted with molten sugar as to make the coldest lookers-on feel faint and subsequently bilious. Nor was it that the figs were moist and pulpy, or that the French plums blushed in modest tartness from their highly-decorated boxes, or that everything was good to eat and in its Christmas dress; but the customers were all so hurried and so eager in the hopeful promise of the day, that they tumbled up against each other at the door, crashing their wicker baskets wildly, and left their purchases upon the counter, and came running back to fetch them, and committed hundreds of like mistakes, in the best humor possible; while the Grocer and his people were so frank and fresh that the polished hearts with which they fastened their aprons might have been their own, worn outside for general inspection, and for Christmas daws to peck at if they chose.”
Charles Dickens, Christmas Books
“En nuestro fuero interno, medimos el tiempo por los cambios y los acontecimientos, no por los años.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“The air was filled with phantoms... and... the misery with them all was, clearly, that they sought to interfere, for good, in human matters, and had lost the power forever.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“He has the power to render us happy or unhappy, to make our service light or burdensome, a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks, in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count 'em up; what then? The happiness he gives is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“Take warning of the consequences of being nobody's enemy but your own.”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings
“... Any Christian spirit working kindly in its little sphere, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for its vast means of usefulness!”
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings