Wild Quotes

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Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed
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Wild Quotes (showing 1-30 of 513)
“What if I forgave myself? I thought. What if I forgave myself even though I'd done something I shouldn't have? What if I was a liar and a cheat and there was no excuse for what I'd done other than because it was what I wanted and needed to do? What if I was sorry, but if I could go back in time I wouldn't do anything differently than I had done? What if I'd actually wanted to fuck every one of those men? What if heroin taught me something? What if yes was the right answer instead of no? What if what made me do all those things everyone thought I shouldn't have done was what also had got me here? What if I was never redeemed? What if I already was?”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I knew that if I allowed fear to overtake me, my journey was doomed. Fear, to a great extent, is born of a story we tell ourselves, and so I chose to tell myself a different story from the one women are told. I decided I was safe. I was strong. I was brave. Nothing could vanquish me.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“How wild it was, to let it be.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“The universe, I'd learned, was never, ever kidding. It would take whatever it wanted and it would never give it back.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I’m a free spirit who never had the balls to be free.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“Alone had always felt like an actual place to me, as if it weren’t a state of being, but rather a room where I could retreat to be who I really was.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“It had nothing to do with gear or footwear or the backpacking fads or philosophies of any particular era or even with getting from point A to point B.

It had to do with how it felt to be in the wild. With what it was like to walk for miles with no reason other than to witness the accumulation of trees and meadows, mountains and deserts, streams and rocks, rivers and grasses, sunrises and sunsets. The experience was powerful and fundamental. It seemed to me that it had always felt like this to be a human in the wild, and as long as the wild existed it would always feel this way.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“The father’s job is to teach his children how to be warriors, to give them the confidence to get on the horse to ride into battle when it’s necessary to do so. If you don’t get that from your father, you have to teach yourself.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“It was all unknown to me then, as I sat on that white bench on the day I finished my hike. Everything except the fact that I didn't have to know. That is was enough to trust that what I'd done was true. To understand its meaning without yet being able to say precisely what it was, like all those lines from The Dream of a Common Language that had run through my nights and days. To believe that I didn't need to reach with my bare hands anymore. To know that seeing the fish beneath the surface of the water was enough. That it was everything. It was my life - like all lives, mysterious and irrevocable and sacred. So very close, so very present, so very belonging to me.
How wild it was, to let it be.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“There's no way to know what makes one thing happen and not another. What leads to what. What destroys what. What causes what to flourish or die or take another course.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I was a terrible believer in things,but I was also a terrible nonbeliever in things. I was as searching as I was skeptical. I didn't know where to put my faith,or if there was such a place,or even what the word faith meant, in all of it's complexity. Everything seemed to be possibly potent and possibly fake.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I didn't get to grow up and pull away from her and bitch about her with my friends and confront her about the things I'd wished she'd done differently and then get older and understand that she had done the best she could and realize that what she had done was pretty damn good and take her fully back into my arms again. Her death had obliterated that. It had obliterated me. It had cut me short at the very heigh of my youthful arrogance. It had forced me to instantly grow up and forgive her every motherly fault at the same time that it kept me forever a child, my life both ended and begun in that premature place where we'd left off. She was my mother, but I was motherless. I was trapped by her, but utterly alone. She would always be the empty bowl that no one could full. I'd have to fill it myself again and again and again.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I'd finally come to understand what it had been: a yearning for a way out, when actually what I had wanted to find was a way in.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I didn't feel sad or happy. I didn't feel proud or ashamed. I only felt that in spite of all the things I'd done wrong, in getting myself here, I'd done right.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“Fear, to a great extent, is born of a story we tell ourselves...”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
tags: fear
“The thing about hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, the thing that was so profound to me that summer—and yet also, like most things, so very simple—was how few choices I had and how often I had to do the thing I least wanted to do. How there was no escape or denial. No numbing it down with a martini or covering it up with a roll in the hay. As I clung to the chaparral that day, attempting to patch up my bleeding finger, terrified by every sound that the bull was coming back, I considered my options. There were only two and they were essentially the same. I could go back in the direction I had come from, or I could go forward in the direction I intended to go.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I was amazed that what I needed to survive could be carried on my back. And, most surprising of all, that I could carry it.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I made it the mantra of those days; when I paused before yet another series of switchbacks or skidded down knee-jarring slopes, when patches of flesh peeled off my feet along with my socks, when I lay alone and lonely in my tent at night I asked, often out loud: Who is tougher than me?

The answer was always the same, and even when I knew absolutely there was no way on this earth that it was true, I said it anyway: No one.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“[Books] were the world I could lose myself in when the one I was actually living in became too lonely or harsh or difficult to bear.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“…the death of my mother was the thing that made me believe the most deeply in my safety: nothing bad could happen to me, I thought. The worst thing already had.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“God is not a granter of wishes. God is a ruthless bitch.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
tags: gods
“Fear begets fear. Power begets power. I willed myself to beget power. And it wasn't long before I actually wasn't afraid.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“That my complicated life could be made so simple was astounding.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“The amount that she loved us was beyond her reach. It could not be quantified or contained. It was the ten thousand named things in the Tao Te Ching’s universe and then ten thousand more. Her love was full-throated and all-encompassing and unadorned. Every day she blew through her entire reserve.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“I was a pebble. I was a leaf. I was the jagged branch of a tree. I was nothing to them and they were everything to me.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“Fear, to a great extent, is born of a story we tell ourselves, and so I chose to tell myself a different story from the one women are told. I decided I was safe. I was strong. I was brave. Nothing could vanquish me. Insisting on this story was a form of mind control, but for the most part, it worked.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
tags: fear
“I had diverged, digressed, wandered, and become wild. I didn't embrace the word as my new name because it defined negative aspects of my circumstances or life, but because even in my darkest days—those very days in which I was naming myself—I saw the power of the darkness. Saw that, in fact, I had strayed and that I was a stray and that from the wild places my straying had brought me, I knew things I couldn't have known before.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“It seemed to me the way it must feel to people who cut themselves on purpose. Not pretty, but clean. Not good, but void of regret. I was trying to heal. Trying to get the bad out of my system so I could be good again. To cure me of myself.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“The clamor of 'What have I gotten myself into?' was a mighty shout. It could not be drowned out. The only possible distraction was my vigilant search for rattlesnakes. I expected one around every bend, ready to strike. The landscape was made for them, it seemed. And also for mountain lions and wilderness-savvy serial killers.

But I wasn't thinking of them.

It was a deal I'd made with myself months before and the only thing that allowed me to hike alone. I knew that if I allowed fear to overtake me, my journey was doomed. Fear, to a great extent, is born of a story we tell ourselves, and so I chose to tell myself a different story from the one women are told. I decided I was safe. I was strong. I was brave. Nothing could vanquish me. Insisting on this story was a form of mind control, but for the most part, it worked. Every time I heard a sound of unknown origin or felt something horrible cohering in my imagination, I pushed it away. I simply did not let myself become afraid. Fear begets fear. Power begets power. I willed myself to beget power. And it wasn't long before I actually wasn't afraid.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
“Uncertain as I was as I pushed forward, I felt right in my pushing, as if the effort itself meant something. That perhaps being amidst the undesecrated beauty of the wilderness meant I too could be undesecrated, regardless of the regrettable things I'd done to others or myself or the regrettable things that had been done to me. Of all the things I'd been skeptical about, I didn't feel skeptical about this: the wilderness had a clarity that included me.”
Cheryl Strayed, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

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