The Gift of the Magi Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Gift of the Magi The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry
75,595 ratings, 4.08 average rating, 1,577 reviews
Open Preview
The Gift of the Magi Quotes Showing 1-16 of 16
“Life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“The magi, as you know, were wise men--wonderfully wise men--who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. O all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Life is full of sniffles sobs and smiles. With sniffles predominating.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl. So Della did it. Which instigates the moral reflection that life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest.”
O. Henry , The Gift of the Magi
“Many a happy hour she had spent planning for something nice for him. Something fine and rare and sterling—something”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Will you buy my hair?”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“It did not exactly beggar description, but it certainly had that word on the lookout for the mendicancy squad.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Twenty dollars a week doesn’t go far.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“One dollar and eighty-seven cents.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Pennies saved one and two at a time”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“Which instigates the moral reflection that life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi
“And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. Of all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi.”
O. Henry, The Gift of the Magi