The Radetzky March Quotes

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The Radetzky March The Radetzky March by Joseph Roth
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The Radetzky March Quotes Showing 1-26 of 26
“A lot of truths about the living world are recorded in bad books; they are just badly written about.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“That was how things were back then. Anything that grew took its time growing, and anything that perished took a long time to be forgotten. But everything that had once existed left its traces, and people lived on memories just as they now live on the ability to forget quickly and emphatically.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“There is a fear of voluptuousness that is itself voluptuous, just as a certain fear of death can itself be deadly.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“The good man believed that shortsighted people were also deaf and that their spectacles would become clearer if their ears heard more sharply.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
tags: funny
“In those days before the Great War when the events narrated in this book took place, it had not yet become a matter of indifference whether a man lived or died. When one of the living had been extinguished another did not at once take his place in order to obliterate him: there was a gap where he had been, and both close and distant witnesses of his demise fell silent whenever they became aware of his gap. When fire had eaten away a house from the row of others in a street, the burnt-out space remained long empty. Masons worked slowly and cautiously. Close neighbors and casual passers-by alike, when they saw the empty space, remembered the aspect and walls of the vanished house. That was how things were then. Everything that grew took its time in growing and everything that was destroyed took a long time to be forgotten. And everything that had once existed left its traces so that in those days people lived on memories, just as now they live by the capacity to forget quickly and completely.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Von der Humanität durch Nationalität zur Bestialität.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“That is how a farmer walks across the soil in spring--and later, in summer, the traces of his steps are obscured by the billowing richness of the wheat he once sowed.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Er war so einfach und untadelig wie seine Konduitenliste, und nur der Zorn, der ihn manchmal ergriff, hätte einen Kenner der Menschen ahnen lassen, daß auch in der Seele des Hauptmanns Trotta die nächtlichen Abgründe dämmerten, in denen die Stürme schlafen und die unbekannten Stimmen namenloser Ahnen.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“In no time, the platoon were on their feet in front of him, formed up into two ranks, and it struck him suddenly, and probably for the first time in his military career, that these men with their drilled precision were dead parts of dead machines that didn't produce anything.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Gradually too, Trotta's disappointment was replaced by a sweet melancholy. He made a pact with his sadness. Everything in the world was as sad as it could be, and at the very heart of this wretched world was the Lieutenant. It was for him that the frogs were bruiting so piteously tonight, and the pain-filled crickets were waiting on his behalf. It was for him that the spring night was filled with such a sweet and easy sadness, for him that the stars were positioned so unattainably high in the sky, and it was to him alone that their light blinked so longingly and vainly. The unending pain of the world fitted itself to Trotta's hurt.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“His heart was pounding. But his soul was easy.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“E il mondo non era più il vecchio mondo. Tramontava. Ed era nell'ordine delle cose che un'ora prima del suo tramonto le valli avessero ragione dei monti, i giovani dei vecchi, gli stolti dei savi.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Morning birdsong filled the room. For all his high opinion of birds, privileged among God's creatures, still, deep in his heart, the Emperor did not trust them, just as he did not trust artists.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Every year, on the Emperor's birthday, he makes a resolution to begin a new life and not get into debt. And so he gets drunk. And comes home late at night, stands in the kitchen with drawn sword, and commands an entire regiment. The pots are platoons, the teacups are units, the plates are companies. Simon Demant is a colonel, a colonel in the service of Franz Joseph I.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Our grandfathers didn't leave us much strength, not enough strength to live with, but just about enough to die a meaningless death. Ach!”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Count Chojnicki was curious. No other passion than curiosity sent him out into the world, drew him to the tables of the great gaming halls, sequestered him behind the walls of his old hunting pavilion, sat him down on the parliamentarians' benches, determined that he would return home every spring, compelled him to throw his regular parties, and prevented him from cutting his own throat. It was curiosity that kept him alive.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“Lieutenant Trotta wasn't experienced enough to know that uncouth peasant boys with noble hearts exist in real life and that a lot of truths about the living world are recorded in bad books; they are just badly written.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“This era no longer wants us! This era wants to create independent nations-states! People no longer believe in God. The new religion is nationalism. Nations no longer go to church. They go to national associations. The Monarchy, our Monarchy, is founded on piety, on the faith that God chose the Hapsburgs to rule over so and so many Christian peoples. Our Emperor is a secular brother of the Pope, he is His Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty; no other is as apostolic, no other majesty in Europe is as dependent on the Grace of God and on the faith of the peoples in the Grace of God… The Emperor of Austria-Hungary must not be abandoned by God.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“She looked like the dangerous proprietress of all the cushions and pillows.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“And so the widow married the periodically demented Taussig. She needed money, and he was less trouble than a baby.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“And the world was not what it had been. It was at an end. And it was in the disposition of these things that, barely an hour before its end, the valleys and the young and the fools would all be in the right, while the mountains and the old and the wise would all be in the wrong.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“And his fondness of people matched his low opinion of them.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“It was quite obvious, it was, as people say, as clear as day, that Lieutenant Trotta, the grandson of the hero of Solferino, was partly bringing about the doom of others, partly being pulled under by those who were themselves going down, and, in any case, that he was one of those unhappy beings on whom an evil power had cast its evil eye.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
tags: doom
“He had lived long enough to know that it is foolish to tell the truth”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“He had lost his meticulous sense of the passing of time ever since he had given up several old habits. For after all, the hours and the days were meant precisely to maintain those habits, and now the hours and the days resembled empty vessels that could no longer be filled and need not be bothered with anymore.”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March
“The officers went about like the baffling followers of some remote and cruel godhead, which simultaneously cast them as its colourfully disguised and magnificently decked sacrificial animals. People looked at them and shook their heads. They even felt sorry for them. They have many advantages, so people said. They can walk around with swords, women fall in love with them, and the Emperor looks after them in person, as if they were his own sons. But then, in a trice, before you've noticed anything, one of them has managed to offend another, and the offence needs to be washed away with red blood!...”
Joseph Roth, The Radetzky March