Modern Man in Search of a Soul Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Modern Man in Search of a Soul Modern Man in Search of a Soul by C.G. Jung
5,644 ratings, 4.17 average rating, 200 reviews
Open Preview
Modern Man in Search of a Soul Quotes (showing 1-30 of 43)
“We cannot change anything unless we accept it.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“How can I be substantial if I do not cast a shadow? I must have a dark side also If I am to be whole.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Faith, hope, love, and insight are the highest achievements of human effort. They are found-given-by experience.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“I have treated many hundreds of patients. Among those in the second half of life - that is to say, over 35 - there has not been one whose problem in the last resort was not that of finding a religious outlook on life. It is safe to say that every one of them fell ill because he had lost that which the living religions of every age have given their followers, and none of them has really been healed who did not regain his religious outlook.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“But what will he do when he sees only too clearly why his patient is ill; when he sees that it arises from his having no love, but only sexuality; no faith, because he is afraid to grope in the dark; no hope, because he is disillusioned by the world and by life; and no understanding, because he has failed to read the meaning of his own existence?”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Whatever we look at, and however we look at it, we see only through our own eyes.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“We cannot change anything unless we accept it. Condemnation does not liberate; it oppresses.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“What is essential in a work of art is that it should rise far above the realm of personal life and speak from the spirit and heart of the poet as man to the spirit and heart of mankind.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“It is painful—there is no denying it—to interpret radiant things from the shadow-side, and thus in a measure reduce them to their origins in dreary filth. But it seems to me to be an imperfection in things of beauty, and a weakness in man, if an explanation from the shadow-side has a destructive effect.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“At first we cannot see beyond the path that leads downward to dark and hateful things but no light or beauty will ever come from the man who cannot bear this sight. Light is always born of darkness, and the sun never yet stood still in heaven to satisfy man's longing or to still his fears.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“what is illusion? By what criterion do we judge something to be an illusion? Does there exist for the psyche anything which we may call "illusion"? What we are pleased to call such may be for the psyche a most important factor of life—something as indispensable as oxygen for the organism—a psychic actuality of prime importance. Presumably the psyche does not trouble itself about our categories of reality, and it would therefore be the better part of wisdom for us to say: everything that acts is actual.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Dreams give information about the secrets of the inner life and reveal to the dreamer hidden factors of his personality. As long as these are undiscovered, they”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“At first we cannot see beyond the path that leads downward to dark and hateful things—but no light or beauty will ever come from the man who cannot bear this sight. Light is always born of darkness, and the sun never yet stood still in heaven to satisfy man's longing or to still his fears.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“The dream gives a true picture of the subjective state, while the conscious mind denies that this state exists, or recognizes it only grudgingly.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“The psyche is a self-regulating system that maintains itself in equilibrium as the body does.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Is that which science calls the “psyche” not merely a question-mark arbitrarily confined within the skull, but rather a door that opens upon the human world from a world beyond, now and again allowing strange and unseizable potencies to act upon him and to remove him, as if upon the wings of the night, from the level of common humanity to that of a more personal vocation?”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“To be "normal" is a splendid ideal for the unsuccessful,”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“It is the growth of consciousness which we must thank for the existence of problems; they are the dubious gift of civilization. It is just man’s turning away from instinct—his opposing himself to instinct—that creates consciousness.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Much of the evil in this world is due to the fact that man, in general, is hopelessly unconscious.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“I am accused of mysticism. I do not, however, hold myself responsible for the fact that man has, everywhere and always, spontaneously developed religious forms of expression, and that the human psyche from time immemorial has been shot through with religious feelings and ideas. Whoever cannot see this aspect of the human psyche is blind, and whoever chooses to explain it away, or to "enlighten" it away, has no sense of reality.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases. Each of us carries his own life-form—an indeterminable form which cannot be superseded by any other.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“teachings about the "infantile-perverse-criminal" unconscious have led people to make a dangerous monster out of the unconscious, that really very natural thing. As if all that is good, reasonable, beautiful and worth living for had taken up its abode in consciousness!”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Culture lies beyond the purpose of nature.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“I do not forget that my voice is but one voice, my experience a mere drop in the sea, my knowledge no greater than the visual field in a microscope, my mind's eye a mirror that reflects a small concern of the world, and my ideas - a subjective confession.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“All these guiding principles in therapy confront the doctor with important ethical duties which can be summed up in the single rule: be the man through whom you wish to influence others.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“Let man but accumulate his materials of destruction and the devil within him will soon be unable to resist putting them to their fated use.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“It is precisely the most subjective ideas which, being closest to nature and to the living being, deserve to be called the truest.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“To cherish secrets and to restrain emotions are psychic misdemeanours for which nature finally visits us with sickness—that is, when we do these things in private. But when they are done in communion with others they satisfy nature and may even count as useful virtues. It is only restraint practised in and for oneself that is unwholesome. It is as if man had an inalienable right to behold all that is dark, imperfect, stupid and guilty in his fellow-beings—for such of course are the things that we keep private to protect ourselves. It seems to be a sin in the eyes of nature to hide our insufficiency—just as much as to live entirely on our inferior side. There appears to be a conscience in mankind which severely punishes the man who does not somehow and at some time, at whatever cost to his pride, cease to defend and assert himself, and instead confess himself fallible and human. Until he can do this, an impenetrable wall shuts him out from the living experience of feeling himself a man among men. Here we find a key to the great significance of true, unstereotyped confession—a significance known in all the initiation and mystery cults of the ancient world, as is shown by a saying from the Greek mysteries: "Give up what thou hast, and then thou wilt receive.”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“for as soon as psychotherapy requires the self-perfecting of the doctor, it is freed from its clinical origins and ceases to be a mere method for treating the sick. It is now of service to the healthy as well,”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul
“The relation between conscious and unconscious is compensatory. This fact, which is easily verifiable, affords a rule for dream interpretation. It is always helpful, when we set out to interpret a dream, to ask: What conscious attitude does it compensate?”
C.G. Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul

« previous 1