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Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things by William McDonough
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Cradle to Cradle Quotes Showing 1-21 of 21
“Here's where redesign begins in earnest, where we stop trying to be less bad and we start figuring out how to be good.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“The average lawn is an interesting beast: people plant it, then douse it with artificial fertilizers and dangerous pesticides to make it grow and to keep it uniform-all so that they can hack and mow what they encouraged to grow. And woe to the small yellow flower that rears its head!”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Ultimately a regulation is a signal of design failure...it is what we call a license to harm: a permit issued by a government to an industry so that it may dispense sickness, destruction, and death at an "acceptable" rate.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“We see a world of abundance, not limits. In the midst of a great deal of talk about reducing the human ecological footprint, we offer a different vision. What if humans designed products and system that celebrate an abundance of human creativity, culture, and productivity? That are so intelligent and safe, our species leaves an ecological footprint to delight in, not lament?”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Consider this: all the ants on the planet, taken together, have a biomass greater than that of humans. Ants have been incredibly industrious for millions of years. Yet their productiveness nourishes plants, animals, and soil. Human industry has been in full swing for little over a century, yet it has brought about a decline in almost every ecosystem on the planet. Nature doesn’t have a design problem. People do.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Glance at the sun.
See the moon and the stars.
Gaze at the beauty of eath’s greenings.
Now, think.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Schumacher posited that people must make a serious shift in what they consider to be wealth and progress: "Ever-bigger machines, entailing ever-bigger concentrations of economic power and exerting ever-greater violence against the environment, do not represent progress: they are a denial of wisdom.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“As long as human beings are regarded as "bad", zero is a good goal. But to be less bad is to accept things as they are, to believe that poorly designed, dishonorable, destructive systems are the best humans can do. This is the ultimate failure of the "be less bad" approach: a failure of the imagination. From our perspective, this is a depressing vision of our species' roles in the world. What about an entirely different model? What would it mean to be 100 percent good?”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Cradle to Cradle is like good gardening; it is not about “saving” the planet but about learning to thrive on it.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“DesignTex, a”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“product of service. Instead”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“valuable technical nutrients—cars, televisions, carpeting, computers, and refrigerators, for”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Dow Chemical has experimented with this concept in Europe, and DuPont is taking up this idea vigorously.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“But from our perspective, products that are not designed particularly for human and ecological health are unintelligent and inelegant - what we call crude products.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“But ultimately a regulation is a signal of design failure. In fact, it is what we call a license to harm: a permit issued by a government to an industry so that it may dispense sickness, destruction, and death at an “acceptable” rate.”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“There is some talk in science and popular culture about colonizing other planets, such as Mars or the moon. Part of this is just human nature: we are curious, exploring creatures. The idea of taming a new frontier has a compelling, even romantic, pull, like that of the moon itself. But the idea also provides rationalization for destruction, an expression of our hope that we’ll find a way to save ourselves if we trash our planet. To this speculation, we would respond: If you want the Mars experience, go to Chile and live in a typical copper mine. There are no animals, the landscape is hostile to humans, and it would be a tremendous challenge. Or, for a moonlike effect, go to the nickel mines of Ontario. Seriously,”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“When you talk about “saving the planet” you turn it into an ethical question, and I think you won’t solve problems if they are ethical.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“what most people see in their garbage cans is just the tip of the material iceberg; the product itself contains on average only 5% of the raw materials involved in the process of making and delivering it.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“The design intention behind the current industrial infrastructure is to make an attractive product that is affordable, meets regulations, performs well enough, and lasts long enough to meet market expectations”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“as a buyer you got the item or service you wanted, plus additives that you didn’t ask for and that may be harmful to you and your loved ones.”
Michael Braungart, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
“Swiss textile mill Röhner. We”
William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things