The Stepford Wives Quotes

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The Stepford Wives The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin
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The Stepford Wives Quotes Showing 1-15 of 15
“You're not going to get any true confessions out of me," she said. "I'm a Leo, and our thing is changing the subject.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“What’s the going price for a stay-in-the-kitchen wife with big boobs and no demands?”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“They never stop, these Stepford wives. They something something all their lives. Work like robots. Yes, that would fit. They work like robots all their lives.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“Sex, yes; sexism, no.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“That green stuff outside is grass, and the yellow stuff coming down on it is sunshine.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“I want you to know I won't always be here,' Fertility says, 'but I'll always find you.”
Chuck Palahniuk, The Stepford Wives
“No, thanks, we’re not keen on cat pix.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“One great difference between good writing, that readers overlook, and bad writing, that they fail to notice, has to do with the number of rewrites and revisions usually required by the former. It isn’t at all easy to write clear, declarative prose—transparency evolves from ruthless cutting and trimming and is hard work—while lumpy, tangle-footed writing flows from the pen as if inspired by the Muse.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“Today the combat takes a different shape; instead of wishing to put man in a prison, woman endeavors to escape from one; she no longer seeks to drag him into the realms of immanence but to emerge, herself, into the light of transcendence. Now the attitude of the males creates a new conflict: it is with a bad grace that the man lets her go.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“And you’ll put a deposit on the house tomorrow?”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“Joanna's period was late but came, thank God and the Pill.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“What’s wrong with Bill McCormick? Can’t he run a washer? I thought he was one of our aerospace brains.” “He’s taking care of Marge,” Kit said, folding the T-shirt. “These things came out nice and white, didn’t they?” She put the folded T-shirt into the laundry basket, smiling. Like an actress in a commercial. That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing suburban housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“Charmaine was Miss Vamp, provocative and come-hithery in floor-length white silk cut clear to her navel; Dave and Shep were provoked and went thither.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives
“Supper?' he asked.
She nodded. 'Would you take them to the pizza place? Or to McDonald's?'
He took his pipe from the table. 'All right,' he said.
'I want to get it done with,' she said. 'Otherwise I won't enjoy next weekend.'
He laid the open book down across his lap and took his pipe-cleaning gadget from the table.
She turned to go, and looked back at him. 'You sure you don't mind?' she asked.
He twisted the gadget back and forth in the pipe bowl. 'Sure,' he said. 'Stay with it.' He looked up at her and smiled. 'I don't mind,' he said.”
Ira Levin, The Stepford Wives