The Animal Dialogues Quotes

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The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild by Craig Childs
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The Animal Dialogues Quotes Showing 1-13 of 13
“Most animals show themselves sparingly. The grizzly bear is six to eight hundred pounds of smugness. It has no need to hide. If it were a person, it would laugh loudly in quiet restaurants, boastfully wear the wrong clothes for special occasions, and probably play hockey.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“Coyotes move within a landscape of attentiveness. I have seen their eyes in the creosote bushes and among mesquite trees. They have watched me. And all the times that I saw no eyes, that I kept walking and never knew, there were still coyotes. When I have seen them trot away, when I have stepped from the floorboard of my truck, leaned on the door, and watched them as they watched me over their shoulders, I have been aware for that moment of how much more there is. Of how I have only seen only an instant of a broad and rich life.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“This is not wilderness for designation or for a park. Not a scenic wilderness and not one good for fishing or the viewing of wildlife. It is wilderness that gets into your nostrils, that runs with your sweat. It is the core of everything living, wilderness like molten iron.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“The elk that you glimpse in the summer, those at the forest edge, are survivors of winter, only the strongest. You see one just before dusk that summer, standing at the perimeter of the meadow so it can step back to the forest and vanish. You can't help imagining the still, frozen nights behind it, so cold that the slightest motion is monumental. I have found their bodies, half drifted over in snow, no sign of animal attack or injury. Just toppled over one night with ice working into their lungs. You wouldn't want to stand outside for more than a few minutes in that kind of weather. If you lived through only one of those winters the way this elk has, you would write books about it. You would become a shaman. You would be forever changed. That elk from the winter stands there on the summer evening, watching from beside the forest. It keeps its story to itself.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“The life of an animal lies outside of conjecture. It is far beyond the scientific papers and the campfire stories. It is as true as breath. It is important as the words of children.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“This far north the sun was still up, although very low, riding through the mountains as if looking for something it lost on the ground.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
tags: nature, sun
“A trademark of something that works well, the cat body has hardly changed since its inception. Like with today's cats, their digestive systems could handle only flesh. The lesson of the cat is that if you are to become a full-fledged carnivore, you have to commit everything to it. A house cat fed vegetarian food will shrivel and die.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“We guard our bodies until they are old and tasteless, when we could have fed ourselves to claw and fur, been literally reincarnated in the cells of a lion sleeping in the sun, the wall of muscle that is a bear crashing through a rotten log in search of ant eggs. Why not return again and again, glistening, gilded every time?”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“Mountain lions are psychological animals, preying on the mind with secret eyes. They know that they still dominate, that they cannot be cornered without ripping their way out. They know that they are still the heart of firceness. Being pack animals ourselves, we humans have some alliance with other pack animals, like wolves or coyotes. When I see a free wolf, I feel as if we could sit down and talk, given that the details have been worked out. Not so with the cat. The cat speaks in symbols.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“Sidewinder tracks lifted off the dunes and flew around us.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“Getting a fly around in here is difficult. Every metaphor of frustration can be held taut on a line caught twenty feet up in an oak tree.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“A wind started up. It began scouring our cheeks, and we lifted hands, blocking our faces from a gauze of blowing sand. So much wind came that it was hard to breathe without covering our noses and mouths. We stood and shouldered our packs to keep going. Sidewinder tracks lifted off the dunes and flew around us.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild
“Blood, for a mosquito, is a delicacy. They otherwise feed on the nectar of flowers.”
Craig Childs, The Animal Dialogues: Uncommon Encounters in the Wild