Undoing Gender Quotes

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Undoing Gender Undoing Gender by Judith Butler
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Undoing Gender Quotes Showing 1-11 of 11
“Let's face it. We're undone by each other. And if we're not, we're missing something. If this seems so clearly the case with grief, it is only because it was already the case with desire. One does not always stay intact. It may be that one wants to, or does, but it may also be that despite one's best efforts, one is undone, in the face of the other, by the touch, by the scent, by the feel, by the prospect of the touch, by the memory of the feel. And so when we speak about my sexuality or my gender, as we do (and as we must), we mean something complicated by it. Neither of these is precisely a possession, but both are to be understood as modes of being dispossessed, ways of being for another, or, indeed, by virtue of another.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“Possibility is not a luxury; it is as crucial as bread.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“What is most important is to cease legislating for all lives what is liveable only for some, and similarly, to refrain from proscribing for all lives what is unlivable for some.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“I'm no great fan of the phallus, and have made my own views known on this subject before, so I do not propose a return to a notion of the phallus as the third term in any and all relations of desire.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“Let’s face it. We’re undone by each other. And if we’re not, we’re missing something. If this seems so clearly the case with grief, it is only because it was already the case with desire. One does not always stay intact. It may be that one wants to, or does, but it may also be that despite one’s best efforts, one is undone, in the face of the other, by the touch, by the scent, be the feel, by the prospect of the touch, by the memory of the feel.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“Democracy does not speak in unison; its tunes are dissonant, and necessarily so. It is not a predictable process; it must be undergone, as a passion must be undergone. It may also be that life itself becomes foreclosed when the right way is decided in advance, or when we impose what is right for everyone, without finding a way to enter into community and discover the "right" in the midst of cultural translation. It may be that what is "right" and what is "good" consist in staying open to the tensions that beset the most fundamental categories we require, to know unknowingness at the core of what we know.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“I may feel that without some recognizability I cannot live. But I may also feel that the terms by which I am recognized make life unlivable. This is the juncture from which critique emerges, where critique is understood as an interrogation of the terms by which life is constrained in order to open up the possibility of different modes of living; in other words, not to celebrate difference as such but to establish more inclusive conditions for sheltering and maintaining life that resists models of assimilation.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“To be called a copy, to be called unreal, is thus one way in which one can be oppressed. But consider that it is more fundamental than that. For to be oppressed means that you already exist as a subject of some kind, you are there as the visible and oppressed other for the master subject as a possible or potential subject. But to be unreal is something else again. For to be oppressed one must first become intelligible. To find that one is fundamentally unintelligible (indeed, that the laws of culture and of language find one to be an impossibility) is to find that one has not yet achieved access to the human. It is to find oneself speaking only and always as if one were human, but with the sense that one is not. It is to find that one's language is hollow, and that no recognition is forthcoming because the norms by which recognition takes place are not in one's favour.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“성적 소수자 영역에 놓인다는 것은 그 무엇보다도 우리가 공적이고 사적인 공간에서의 보호에 의존하고, 우리를 폭력으로부터 보호해줄 법적 인가에 의존하며, 우리에게 가해진 원치 않는 공격과 때로 선동된 폭력 행위에 맞설 여러 제도적 보호책에 의존한다는 의미다. 그런 의미에서 우리의 삶 자체, 욕망의 지속성 자체가 인간으로서의 생존 가능성을 생산하고 유지하는 인정 규범의 존재에 의존한다. 따라서 우리가 성적 권리에 대해서 말할 때 우리는 그저 개인의 욕망에 관한 권리를 말하는 것이 아니라 우리의 개인성이 의존하는 규범을 말하고 있는 것이다. 그 말은 권리에 관한 담론이 우리의 의존성을 선언한다는 뜻, 즉 타인의 손에 달린 우리의 존재 양식, 그것 없이는 우리가 존재할 수 없는 타인과의, 또 타인에 대한 존재 양식을 선언한다는 뜻이다.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“An ethical query emerges in light of such an analysis: how might we encounter the difference that calls our grids of intelligibility into question without trying to foreclose the challenge that the difference delivers? What might it mean to learn to live in the anxiety of that challenge, to feel the surety of one’s epistemological and ontological anchor go, but to be willing, in the name of the human, to allow the human to become something other than what it is traditionally assumed to be? This means that we must learn to live and to embrace the destruction and rearticulation of the human in the name of a more capacious and, finally, less violent world, not knowing in advance what precise form our humanness does and will take. It means we must be open to its permutations, in the name of nonviolence. As Adriana Cavarero points out, paraphrasing Arendt, the question we pose to the Other is simple and unanswerable: “who are you?” The violent response is the one that does not ask, and does not seek to know. It wants to shore up what it knows, to expunge what threatens it with not-knowing, what forces it to reconsider the presuppositions of its world, their contingency, their malleability. The nonviolent response lives with its unknowingness about the Other in the face of the Other, since sustaining the bond that the question opens is finally more valuable than knowing in advance what holds us in common, as if we already have all the resources we need to know what defines the human, what its future life might be.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender
“That my agency is riven with paradox does not mean it is impossible. It means only that paradox is the condition of its possibility.”
Judith Butler, Undoing Gender