The Tale of Despereaux Quotes

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The Tale of Despereaux The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo
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The Tale of Despereaux Quotes (showing 1-30 of 91)
“There is nothing sweeter in this sad world than the sound of someone you love calling your name.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Stories are light. Light is precious in a world so dark. Begin at the beginning. Tell Gregory a story. Make some light.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“There are those hearts, reader, that never mend again once they are broken. Or if they do mend, they heal themselves in a crooked and lopsided way, as if sewn together by a careless craftsman. Such was the fate of Chiaroscuro. His heart was broken. Picking up the spoon and placing it on his head, speaking of revenge, these things helped him to put his heart together again. But it was, alas, put together wrong.”
Kate DiCamillo, Despereaux = Tale of Despereaux
“Once upon a time," he said out loud to the darkness. He said these words because they were the best, the most powerful words that he knew and just the saying of them comforted him.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Reader, you must know that an interesting fate (sometimes involving rats, sometimes not) awaits almost everyone, mouse or man, who does not conform.”
Kate DiCamillo, Despereaux = Tale of Despereaux
tags: fate
“The world is dark, and light is precious.
Come closer, dear reader.
You must trust me.
I am telling you a story.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Love, as we have already discussed, is a powerful, wonderful, ridiculous thing, capable of moving mountains. And spools of thread.”
Kate DiCamillo, Despereaux = Tale of Despereaux
“This is the danger of loving: No matter how powerful you are, no matter how many kingdoms you rule, you cannot stop those you love from dying.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“But, reader, there is no comfort in the word "farewell," even if you say it in French. "Farewell" is a word that,in any language, is full of sorrow. It is a word that promises absolutely nothing.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Stories are light. Light is precious in a world so dark.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Say it, reader. Say the word 'quest' out loud. It is an extraordinary word, isn't it? So small and yet so full of wonder, so full of hope.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Reader, do you think it is a terrible thing to hope when there is really no reason to hope at all? Or is it (as the soldier said about happiness) something that you might just as well do, since,in the end, it really makes no difference to anyone but you?”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
tags: hope
“Despereaux marveled at his own bravery.
He admired his own defiance.
And then, reader, he fainted.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Love is ridiculous. But love is also wonderful. And powerful. And Despereaux's love for the Princess Pea would prove, in time, to be all of these things: powerful, wonderful, and ridiculous.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Despereaux looked at his father, at his grey-streaked fur and trembling whiskers and his front paws clasped together in front of his heart, and he felt suddenly as if his own heart would break in two. His father looked so small, so sad.
"Forgive me," said Lester again.
Forgiveness, reader, is, I think, something very much like hope and love - a powerful, wonderful thing.
And a ridiculous thing, too.
Isn't it ridiculous, after all, to think that a son could forgive his father for beating the drum that sent him to his death? Isn't it ridiculous to think that a mouse ever could forgive anyone for such perfidy?
But still, here are the words Despereaux Tilling spoke to his father. He said, "I forgive you, Pa."
And he said those words because he sensed it was the only way to save his own heart, to stop it from breaking in two. Despereaux, reader, spoke those words to save himself.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Did you think that rats do not have hearts? Wrong. All living things have a heart. And the heart of any living thing can be broken.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“There ain't a body, be it mouse or man, that ain't made better by a little soup.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Forgiveness, reader, is, I think, something very much like hope and love - a powerful, wonderful thing.
And a ridiculous thing, too.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“the story is not a pretty one. there is violence in it. And cruelty. But stories that are not pretty have a certain value, too, I suppose. Everything, as you well know (having lived in this world long enough to have figured out a thing or two for yourself), cannont always be sweetness and light.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“And so he was reading the story as if it were a spell and the words of it, spoken aloud, could make magic happen.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Pea was aware suddenly of how fragile her heart was, how much darkness was inside it, fighting, always, with the light. She did not like the rat. She would neverlike the rat, but she knew what she must do to save her own heart.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“He was reading from the beginning so that he could get to the end, where the reader was assured that the knight and the fair maiden lived together happily ever after.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Rats have a sense of humor. Rats, in fact think the world is very funny. And they are right, dear reader. They are right.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“And hope is like love...a ridiculous, wonderful, powerful thing.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
tags: hope, love
“But still, here are the words Despereaux Tilling spoke to his father. He said,
"I forgive you, Pa!" And he said those words because he sensed that it was the only way to save his heart, to stop it from breaking in two. Despereaux, reader, spoke those words to save himself.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“The shapes arranged themselves into words, and the words spelled out a delicious and wonderful phrase: Once upon a time.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Despereaux," she whispered.
And then she shouted it, "Despereaux!"
Reader, nothing is sweeter in this sad world than the sound of someone you love calling your name.
Nothing.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Everything, as you well know . . . cannot always be sweetness and light.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
“Allow me to congratulate you on your very astute powers of observation.”
Kate DiCamillo, The Tale of Despereaux
tags: humor
“At the thought of being eaten by rats, Despereaux forgot about being brave. He forgot about not being a disappointment. He felt himself heading into another faint. But his mother, who had an excellent sense of dramatic timing, beat him to it; she executed a beautiful, flawless swoon, landing right at Despereaux's feet.”
Kate DiCamillo, Despereaux = Tale of Despereaux

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