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Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life by Richard Rohr
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Falling Upward Quotes Showing 31-60 of 168
“As Desmond Tutu told me on a recent trip to Cape Town, “We are only the light bulbs, Richard, and our job is just to remain screwed in!”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“The shape of evil is much more superficiality and blindness than the usual list of hot sins. God hides, and is found, precisely in the depths of everything.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“We are usually on bended knee before laws or angrily reacting against them, both immature responses.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“a person must pass the lessons learned on to others—or there has been no real gift at all.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Denial of our pattern of failure seems to be a kind of practical atheism or chosen ignorance among many believers and clergy.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Yes, transformation is often more about unlearning than learning, which is why the religious traditions call it “conversion” or “repentance.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Truth is not always about pragmatic problem solving and making things “work,” but about reconciling contradictions. Just because something might have some dire effects does not mean it is not true or even good. Just because something pleases people does not make it true either.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Integrity largely has to do with purifying our intentions and a growing honesty about our actual motives.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“In the second half of life, we do not have strong and final opinions about everything, every event, or most people, as much as we allow things and people to delight us, sadden us, and truly influence us.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Sometimes it seems that half of the fairy tales of the world are some form of Cinderella, ugly duckling, or poor boy story, telling of the little person who has no power or possessions who ends up being king or queen, prince or princess. We write it off as wishful dreaming, when it is actually the foundational pattern of disguise or amnesia, loss, and recovery. Every Beauty is sleeping, it seems, before it can meet its Prince. The duckling must be “ugly,” or there will be no story. The knight errant must be wounded, or he will never even know what the Holy Grail is, much less find it. Jesus must be crucified, or there can be no resurrection. It is written in our hardwiring, but can only be heard at the soul level. It will usually be resisted and opposed at the ego level.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“We grow spiritually much more by doing it wrong than by doing it right.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“It is not that suffering or failure might happen, or that it will only happen to you if you are bad (which is what religious people often think), or that it will happen to the unfortunate, or to a few in other places, or that you can somehow by cleverness or righteousness avoid it. No, it will happen, and to you! Losing, failing, falling, sin, and the suffering that comes from those experiences—all of this is a necessary and even good part of the human journey.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“I guess prophets are those who do not care whether you are ready to hear their message. They say it because it has to be said and because it is true.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Jesus praised faith and trust – even more than love. It takes a foundational trust to fall, or to fail, and not to fall apart.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Invariably when something upsets you, and you have a strong emotional reaction out of proportion to the moment, your shadow self has just been exposed. So watch for any overreactions or overdenials.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“It is no surprise that the first and always unwelcome message of male initiation rites is LIFE – IS – HARD.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Basically, the first half of life is writing the text, and the second half is writing the commentary on that text.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Often it takes outer authority to send us on the path to our own inner authority.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“One of the great surprises is that humans come to full consciousness precisely by shadowboxing, facing their own contradictions, and making friends with their own mistakes and failings. People who have had no inner struggles are invariably both superficial and uninteresting. We tend to endure them more than communicate with them, because they have little to communicate.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“In fact, I would say that the demand for the perfect is the greatest enemy of the good.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“If you try to assert wisdom before people have themselves walked it, be prepared for much resistance, denial, push-back, and verbal debate.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Western people are a ritually starved people, and in this are different than most of human history.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“In much of urban and Western civilization today, with no proper tragic sense of life, we try to believe that it is all upward and onward--and by ourselves. It works for so few, and it cannot serve us well in the long run--because it is not true. It is an inherently win-lose game, and more and more people find themselves on the losing side.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“If we go to the depths of anything, we will begin to knock upon something substantial, “real,” and with a timeless quality to it. We will move from the starter kit of “belief” to an actual inner knowing. This is most especially true if we have ever (1) loved deeply, (2) accompanied someone through the mystery of dying, (3) or stood in genuine life-changing awe before mystery, time, or beauty.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“There must be, and, if we are honest, there always will be at least one situation in our lives that we cannot fix, control, explain, change, or even understand. For Jesus and for his followers, the crucifixion became the dramatic symbol of that necessary and absurd stumbling stone.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“The bottom line of the Gospel is that most of us have to hit some kind of bottom before we even start the real spiritual journey.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“So get ready for a great adventure, the one you were really born for. If we never get to our little bit of heaven, our life does not make much sense, and we have created our own “hell.” So get ready for some new freedom, some dangerous permission, some hope from nowhere, some unexpected happiness, some stumbling stones, some radical grace, and some new and pressing responsibility for yourself and for our suffering world.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Human maturity is neither offensive nor defensive; it is finally able to accept that reality is what it is.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“If there is such a thing as human perfection, it seems to emerge precisely from how we handle the imperfection that is everywhere, especially our own. What a clever place for God to hide holiness, so that only the humble and earnest will find it! A “perfect” person ends up being one who can consciously forgive and include imperfection rather than one who thinks he or she is totally above and beyond imperfection.”
Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life
“Self-help courses will only help you if they teach you to pay attention to life itself.”
Richard rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life