The Burnout Society Quotes

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The Burnout Society The Burnout Society by Byung-Chul Han
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The Burnout Society Quotes Showing 1-30 of 98
“The complaint of the depressive individual, “Nothing is possible,” can only occur in a society that thinks, “Nothing is impossible.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“The acceleration of contemporary life also plays a role in this lack of being. The society of laboring and achievement is not a free society. It generates new constraints. Ultimately, the dialectic of master and slave does not yield a society where everyone is free and capable of leisure, too. Rather, it leads to a society of work in which the master himself has become a laboring slave. In this society of compulsion, everyone carries a work camp inside. This labor camp is defined by the fact that one is simultaneously prisoner and guard, victim and perpetrator. One exploits oneself. It means that exploitation is possible even without domination.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“From a pathological standpoint, the incipient twenty-first century is determined neither by bacteria nor by viruses, but by neurons. Neurological illnesses such as depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), and burnout syndrome mark the landscape of pathology at the beginning of the twenty-first century. They are not infections, but infarctions; they do not follow from the negativity of what is immunologically foreign, but from an excess of positivity. Therefore, they elude all technologies and techniques that seek to combat what is alien.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“In social networks, the function of "friends" is primarily to heighten narcissism by granting attention, as consumers, to the ego exhibited as a commodity.”
Byung-Chul Han, Müdigkeitsgesellschaft
“If sleep represents the high point of bodily relaxation, deep boredom is the peak of mental relaxation. A purely hectic rush produces nothing new. It reproduces and accelerates what is already available.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“Today’s society is no longer Foucault’s disciplinary world of hospitals, madhouses, prisons, barracks, and factories. It has long been replaced by another regime, namely a society of fitness studios, office towers, banks, airports, shopping malls, and genetic laboratories. Twenty-first-century society is no longer a disciplinary society, but rather an achievement society [Leistungsgesellschaft]. Also, its inhabitants are no longer “obedience-subjects” but “achievement-subjects.” They are entrepreneurs of themselves.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“Depression—which often culminates in burnout—follows from overexcited, overdriven, excessive self-reference that has assumed destructive traits. The exhausted, depressive achievement-subject grinds itself down, so to speak. It is tired, exhausted by itself, and at war with itself. Entirely incapable of stepping outward, of standing outside itself, of relying on the Other, on the world, it locks its jaws on itself; paradoxically, this leads the self to hollow and empty out. It wears itself out in a rat race it runs against itself.”
Byung-Chul Han, Müdigkeitsgesellschaft
“What proves problematic is not individual competition per se, but rather its self-referentiality, which escalates into absolute competition. That is, the achievement-subject competes with itself; it succumbs to the destructive compulsion to outdo itself over and over, to jump over its own shadow. This self-constraint, which poses as freedom, has deadly results.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“According to Ehrenberg, depression spreads when the commandments and prohibitions of disciplinary society yield to self-responsibility and initiative. In reality, it is not the excess of responsibility and initiative that makes one sick, but the imperative to achieve: the new commandment of late-modern labor society.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“The complaint of the depressive individual, “Nothing is possible,” can only occur in a society that thinks, “Nothing is impossible.” No-longer-being-able-to-be-able leads to destructive self-reproach and auto-aggression. The achievement-subject finds itself fighting with itself. The depressive has been wounded by internalized war. Depression is the sickness of a society that suffers from excessive positivity. It reflects a humanity waging war on itself.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“Every age has its signature afflictions. Thus, a bacterial age existed; at the latest, it ended with the discovery of antibiotics. Despite widespread fear of an influenza epidemic, we are not living in a viral age. Thanks to immunological technology, we have already left it behind. From a pathological standpoint, the incipient twenty-first century is determined neither by bacteria nor by viruses, but by neurons. Neurological illnesses such as depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), and burnout syndrome mark the landscape of pathology at the beginning of the twenty-first century.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“(«Nunca está nadie más activo que cuando no hace nada, nunca está menos solo que cuando está consigo mismo»).”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“«primera enseñanza preliminar para la espiritualidad». Según Nietzsche, uno tiene que aprender a «no responder inmediatamente a un impulso, sino a controlar los instintos que inhiben y ponen término a las cosas». La vileza y la infamia consisten en la «incapacidad de oponer resistencia a un impulso», de oponerle un No. Reaccionar”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“Depression severs all attachments. Mourning differs from depression above all through its strong libidinal attachment to an object. In contrast, depression is objectless and therefore undirected. It is important to distinguish depression from melancholy. Melancholy is preceded by the experience of loss. Therefore it still stands in a relation - namely, negative relation - to the absent thing or party. In contrast, depression is cut off from all relation and attachment. It utterly lacks gravity.”
Byung-Chul Han, Müdigkeitsgesellschaft
“La cultura requiere un entorno en el que sea posible una atención profunda.”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio: Segunda edición ampliada
“La sociedad disciplinaria de Foucault, que consta de hospitales, psiquiátricos, cárceles, cuarteles y fábricas, ya no se corresponde con la sociedad de hoy en día. En su lugar se ha establecido desde hace tiempo otra completamente diferente, a saber: una sociedad de gimnasios, torres de oficinas, bancos, aviones, grandes centros comerciales y laboratorios genéticos. La sociedad del siglo XXI ya no es disciplinaria, sino una sociedad de rendimiento. Tampoco sus habitantes se llaman ya «sujetos de obediencia», sino «sujetos de rendimiento». Estos sujetos son emprendedores de sí mismos.”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“A la vida desnuda, convertida en algo totalmente efímero, se reacciona justo con mecanismos como la hiperactividad, la histeria del trabajo y la producción. También la actual aceleración está ligada a esa falta de Ser. La sociedad de trabajo y rendimiento no es ninguna sociedad libre. Produce nuevas obligaciones. La dialéctica del amo y el esclavo no conduce finalmente a aquella sociedad en la que todo aquel que sea apto para el ocio es un ser libre, sino más bien a una sociedad de trabajo, en la que el amo mismo se ha convertido en esclavo del trabajo. En”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“Today, even the so-called immigrant is not an immunological Other, not a foreigner in the strong sense, who poses a real danger or of whom one is afraid. Immigrants and refugees are more likely to be perceived as burdens than as threats.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“The violence of positivity does not deprive, it saturates; it does not exclude, it exhausts.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“The late-modern achievement-subject does not pursue works of duty. Its maxims are not obedience, law, and the fulfillment of obligation, but rather freedom, pleasure, and inclination. Above all, it expects the profits of enjoyment from work. It works for pleasure and does not act at the behest of the Other. Instead, it hearkens mainly to itself. After all, it must be a self-starting entrepreneur”
Byung-Chul Han, Müdigkeitsgesellschaft
“«[…] los dos estábamos cayendo ya, cada uno por su lado; cada uno a su cansancio más propio y particular, no al nuestro, sino al mío de aquí y al tuyo de allá».”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“Deep tiredness loosens the strictures of identity. Things flicker, twinkle, and vibrate at the edges. They grow less determinate and more porous and lose some of their resolution. This particular in-difference lends them an aura of friendliness. Rigid delimitation with respect to one’s surroundings is suspended:”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“Numquam se plus agere quam nihil cum ageret; numquam minus solum esse quam cum solus esset”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio
“Culture presumes an environment in which deep attention is possible. Increasingly, such immersive reflection is being displaced by an entirely different form of attention: hyperattention.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“La positividad del poder es mucho más eficiente que la negatividad del deber. De este modo, el inconsciente social pasa del deber al poder. El sujeto de rendimiento es más rápido y más productivo que el de obediencia. Sin embargo, el poder no anula el deber. El sujeto de rendimiento sigue disciplinado. Ya ha pasado por la fase disciplinaria. El poder eleva el nivel de productividad obtenida por la técnica disciplinaria, esto es, por el imperativo del deber.”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio: Segunda edición ampliada
“Nietzsche already observed that, after the death of God, health rose to divine status. If a horizon of meaning extended beyond bare life, the cult of health would not be able to achieve this degree of absoluteness.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“En la meditación zen, por ejemplo, se intenta alcanzar la pura negatividad del «no-...», es decir, el vacío, liberándose del Algo atosigante que se impone. La negatividad del «no-...» constituye un proceso extremadamente activo, a saber, es todo menos pasividad. Es un ejercicio que consiste en alcanzar en sí mismo un punto de soberanía, en ser centro.”
Byung-Chul Han, La sociedad del cansancio: Segunda edición ampliada
“Love of self is still determined by negativity insofar as it devalues and wards off the Other in favor of the Own.”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“So long as what is foreign does not attract unwelcome attention, immune defenses ignore it. It follows that the biological immune system is more hospitable than previously assumed. That is, it does not harbor xenophobia. As such, it proves more intelligent than human societies. Xenophobia is a pathologically escalated immunoreaction that proves damaging to one’s own development”
Byung-Chul Han, The Burnout Society
“Wir optimieren uns zu Tode, um besser funktionieren zu können.”
Byung-Chul Han, Müdigkeitsgesellschaft

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