This is Service Design Thinking Quotes

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This is Service Design Thinking: Basics – Tools – Cases This is Service Design Thinking: Basics – Tools – Cases by Marc Stickdorn
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“Designers possess more than simply an ability to style products; they are practitioners of an applied process of creative skills: identifying problems, researching, analysing, evaluating, synthesising and then conceptualising, testing and communicating solutions.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY CANVAS At the online touchpoint of the book we provide you with a canvas developed to support you when designing services. You can use it not only for yourself to get a quick overview of certain service processes, but also with providers for a self-portrayal and with customers and other stakeholders to explore and evaluate services. Besides visually simplifying existing services, you can also use it to sketch service improvements and innovations. It supports many of the tools presented later in this book. The Customer Journey Canvas is available under cc license on our website. Try it, adapt or modify it, take a snapshot and share how you use the canvas through our website. Watch out for service design thinking! NOTE:”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“5 principles of service design thinking MARC STICKDORN 1. User-centred Services should be experienced through the customer’s eyes. 2. Co-creative All stakeholders should be included in the service design process. 3. Sequencing The service should be visualised as a sequence of interrelated actions. 4. Evidencing Intangible services should be visualised in terms of physical artefacts. 5. Holistic The entire environment of a service should be considered. A”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“In order to design for understanding, we need to understand design.” — Erik Spiekermann, graphic designer When”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Services are a series of interactions between customers and the service system through many different touchpoints during the customer journey. As the sole way that customers relate to your services, you would think that interactions would be centre stage for all service providers. So, why are so many services so bad? When Demos, a UK think tank, talk of a fundamental disconnection between services and people, one of the main reasons they give is the poor consideration of the interactions between the service provider and the customer – the interaction design. To value your customer, you need to spend some time understanding the interactions they have with your service, and that means two things. Firstly, viewing your service through the customers’ eyes, and secondly, designing in such a way that customers receive consistent experiences over time which they consider valuable. It’s strange, but repeatedly we see companies ignoring both of these aspects, with the consequence that customers feel ignored and value is lost. One”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“The series of interactions outline a so called customer journey through the offerings of the respective service.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“you need to think of the three elements of utility, usability and pleasurability as a mixing desk so that you can fine-tune your interactive solution and find your own mix. A”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“The basis of the Actors part is a recent development in the area of value networks as an alternative to the value chain.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Joseph Pine and James Gilmore describe this as “The Experience Economy” (Pine & Gilmore, 1999). Functionality and usability are not enough in our lives; they have become to be expected as a baseline. What customers are looking for are emotional bonds and experiences. Experiences are now a valuable differentiator and not only offer a pleasurable service experience, they help us create and express our identities. Several”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“The role of a graphic designer does not lie in sticking a previously developed logo on each and every surface.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“This website was promoted online through Twitter, Facebook and various blogs, and through the online service design communities”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“This website was promoted online through Twitter, Facebook and various blogs, and through the online service design communities like the Service Design Network or Wenovski.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“We collected more than 50 descriptions of service design methods and tools. In a following step, these were evaluated through a Uservoice forum, where a sum of 1188 votes decided which ones should be printed in the book.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Using Panoremo, a tool developed to generate emotional feedback for 360° environments, we gathered 168 emotional hotspots for these five pages.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Developing”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“When you have two coffee shops right next to each other, and each sells the exact same coffee at the exact same price, service design is what makes you walk into one and not the other. — 31 VOLTS SERVICE DESIGN, 2008”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“An example of these changes was the addition of three extra factors to the classic “4 Ps” of the mar-keting mix of product, price, promotion and place: participants (the human actors involved in the service encounter), processes (procedures, mechanisms and flows of activities) and physical evidence (the physical surroundings and tangible clues) (Booms and Bitner, 1981).”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Design is arguably now focused on the interaction between people and technology, and products serve as platforms for experiences, functionality and service offerings (Buchanan, 2001). The Industrial Designers Society of America defines industrial design as a professional service of creating and developing concepts and specifications that optimise the function, value and appearance of products and systems for the mutual benefit of both user and manufacturer (IDSA, 2010). Thus it can be perceived that industrial design is itself a service that benefits users and manufacturers of products and services. Design”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“For a useful and concise introduction to ethnography, the book Social & Cultural Anthropology by John Monaghan and Peter Just (2000) is a good start.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Branding refers to helping an offering establish a visual identity and familiarity in the eyes of customers.”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“Literature and practice refer to various other frameworks made up of three to seven or even more steps, but fundamentally they all share the same mindset (Best, 2006; Mager, 2009; Miettinen & Koivisto, 2009). The wording also varies: identify-build-measure (Engine, 2009), insight-idea-prototyping-delivery (live|work, 2009), discovering-concepting-designing-building-implementing (Designthinkers, 2009), to highlight just a few. When”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases
“There are three keys to unlock the door to usability: frequency, sequence and importance. Frequency says that things the customers do most frequently (e.g. next, back, search etc) should have a prominent position in the sequence. Sequence says that activities that occur in sequence should be presented in sequence (i.e. you pay at the end of a transaction, not in the middle). Importance means that important pieces of information need to be given clearly and at the right time (e.g. if you only ship within the EU, then a customer trying to buy from India needs to know this early on – not at the end of a six-page check-out dialogue).”
Marc Stickdorn, This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases