The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson Quotes

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The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickinson
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The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson Quotes Showing 1-30 of 102
“Not knowing when the dawn will come
I open every door.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I'm nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there ’s a pair of us—don’t tell!
They ’d banish us, you know.

How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Nature is a haunted house--but Art--is a house that tries to be haunted.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
A Word is Dead

A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.

I say it just
Begins to live
That day.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“One need not be a chamber to be haunted.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune without the words,
And never stops at all,

And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.

I've heard it in the chilliest land
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Love is anterior to life, posterior to death, initial of creation, and the exponent of breath.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“If you were coming in the fall,
I'd brush the summer by,
With half a smile and half a spurn,
As housewives do a fly.

If I could see you in a year,
I'd wind the months in balls,
And put them each in separate drawers,
Until their time befalls.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
tags: love
Much Madness Is Divinest Sense

Much Madness is divinest Sense —
To a discerning Eye —
Much Sense — the starkest Madness —
'Tis the Majority
In this, as All, prevail —
Assent — and you are sane —
Demur — you're straightway dangerous —
And handled with a Chain —”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,
One clover, and a bee,
And revery.
The revery alone will do,
If bees are few.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I felt a Funeral, in my Brain,
And Mourners to and fro
Kept treading – treading – till it seemed
That Sense was breaking through –

And when they all were seated,
A Service, like a Drum –
Kept beating – beating – till I thought
My Mind was going numb –

And then I heard them lift a Box
And creak across my Soul
With those same Boots of Lead, again,
Then Space – began to toll,

As all the Heavens were a Bell,
And Being, but an Ear,
And I, and Silence, some strange Race
Wrecked, solitary, here –

And then a Plank in Reason, broke,
And I dropped down, and down –
And hit a World, at every plunge,
And Finished knowing – then –”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“To be alive──is Power.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I felt a Cleaving in my Mind—
As if my Brain had split—
I tried to match it—Seam by Seam—
But could not make it fit.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I cannot live with you,
It would be life,
And life is over there
Behind the shelf ”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Heart, we will forget him!
You and I, to-night!
You may forget the warmth he gave,
I will forget the light.

When you have done, pray tell me,
That I my thoughts may dim;
Haste! lest while you’re lagging,
I may remember him!”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“To see her is a picture-
To hear her is a tune-
To know her an Intemperance
As innocent as June-
To know her not-Affliction-
To own her for a Friend
A warmth as near as if the the Sun
Were shining in your Hand.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“The Soul selects her own Society.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
tags: soul
“I held a jewel in my fingers
And went to sleep.
The day was warm, and winds were prosy;
I said: "'T will keep."

I woke and chid my honest fingers,—
The gem was gone;
And now an amethyst remembrance
Is all I own.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“He fumbles at your spirit
As players at the keys
Before they drop full music on;
He stuns you by degrees.

Prepares your brittle substance
For the ethereal blow
by fainter hammers, further heard,
Then nearer, then so slow

Your breath has time to straighten
Your brain to bubble cool,-
Deals one imperial thunderbolt
That scalps your naked soul.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“A charm invests a face
Imperfectly beheld,—
The lady dare not lift her veil
For fear it be dispelled.

But peers beyond her mesh,
And wishes, and denies,—
Lest interview annul a want
That image satisfies.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“To see the Summer Sky
Is Poetry, though never in a Book it lie—
True Poems flee—”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“A precious, mouldering pleasure ’t is
To meet an antique book,
In just the dress his century wore;
A privilege, I think.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“It might be lonelier
Without the Loneliness —
I'm so accustomed to my Fate —
Perhaps the Other — Peace —

Would interrupt the Dark —
And crowd the little Room —
Too scant — by Cubits — to contain
The Sacrament — of Him —

I am not used to Hope —
It might intrude upon —
Its sweet parade — blaspheme the place —
Ordained to Suffering —

It might be easier
To fail — with Land in Sight —
Than gain — My Blue Peninsula —
To perish — of Delight —

F535 (1863) J405”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“Tell all the truth but tell it slant.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I HIDE myself within my flower
That wearing on your breast,
You, unsuspecting, wear me too—
And angels know the rest.

I hide myself within my flower,
That, fading from your vase,
You, unsuspecting, feel for me
Almost a loneliness...”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“The Brain - is wider than the Sky -
For - put them side by side -
The one the other will contain
With ease - and You - beside -

The Brain is deeper than the sea -
For- hold them - Blue to Blue -
The one the other will absorb -
As Sponges - Buckets - do -

The Brain is just the weight of God -
For - Heft them - Pound for Pound -
And they will differ - if they do -
As Syllable from Sound.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“I stepped from Plank to Plank
So slow and cautiously
The Stars about my Head I felt,
About my Feet the Sea.

I knew not but the next
Would be my final inch —
This gave me that precarious Gait
Some call Experience.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“A Word that Breathes Distinctly
Has not the Power to Die”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
“One need not be a chamber to be haunted,
One need not be a house;
The brain has corridors surpassing
Material place.

Far safer, of a midnight meeting
External ghost,
Than an interior confronting
That whiter host.

Far safer through an Abbey gallop,
The stones achase,
Than, moonless, one's own self encounter
In lonesome place.

Ourself, behind ourself concealed,
Should startle most;
Assassin, hid in our apartment,
Be horror's least.

The prudent carries a revolver,
He bolts the door,
O'erlooking a superior spectre
More near.”
Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson

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