Worship by the Book Quotes

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Worship by the Book Worship by the Book by D.A. Carson
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“Although there are things that can be done to enhance corporate worship, there is a profound sense in which excellent worship cannot be attained merely by pursuing excellent worship. In the same way that, according to Jesus, you cannot find yourself until you lose yourself, so also you cannot find excellent corporate worship until you stop trying to find excellent corporate worship and pursue God himself. Despite the protestations, one sometimes wonders if we are beginning to worship worship rather than worship God. As a brother put it to me, it’s a bit like those who begin by admiring the sunset and soon begin to admire themselves admiring the sunset.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“You cannot find excellent corporate worship until you stop trying to find excellent corporate worship and pursue God himself.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“The notion that you can come to church on Sunday and bend your knee in worship when in fact you have not done so during the week is a delusion.”
Mark Ashton, Worship by the Book
“Worship is the proper response of all moral, sentient beings to God, ascribing all honor and worth to their Creator-God”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“we cannot imagine that the church gathers for worship on Sunday morning if by this we mean that we then engage in something that we have not been engaging in the rest of the week.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“Worship embraces relationship, attitude, act, life.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“retelling ought to prove formative, nurturing, stabilizing, delightful.26”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“So long as man remains free he strives for nothing so incessantly and so painfully as to find someone to worship.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book
“What ought to make worship delightful to us is not, in the first instance, its novelty or its aesthetic beauty, but its object: God himself is delightfully wonderful, and we learn to delight in him.”
Mark Ashton, Worship by the Book
“By the time of the Mosaic covenant, the peace offering (Lev 17:11ff.) was the divinely prescribed means of maintaining a harmonious relationship between God and his covenant people. The sin offering (Lev 4) dealt with sin as a barrier between the worshipers and God. This sin offering was a slaughtered bull, lamb, or goat with which the worshiper had identified himself by laying his hands on its head. When the blood of the victim, signifying its life (Lev 17:11), was daubed on the horns of the altar, symbolizing the presence of God, God and the worshipers were united in a renewed relationship.”
D.A. Carson, Worship by the Book