The Call of Stories Quotes

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The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination by Robert Coles
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“Where you read a book and when and with whom can make a big difference.”
Robert Coles, The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination
“Be a good listener in the special way a story requires: note the manner of presentation; the development of plot, character; the addition of new dramatic sequences; the emphasis accorded to one figure or another in the recital; and the degree of enthusiam, of coherence, the narrator gives to his or her account.”
Robert Coles, The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination
“Novels and stories are renderings of life; they cannot only keep us company, but admonish us, point us in new directions, or give us the courage to stay a given course. They can offer us kinsmen, kinswomen, comrades, advisors — offer us other eyes through which we might see ... Every...student...will all too quickly be beyond schooling, will be out there making a living and, too, just plain living — that is, trying to find and offer to others the affection and love that give purpose to our time spent here....[Characters] can be cautionary figures...who give us pause and help us in the private moments when we try to find our own bearings”
Robert Coles, M.D., The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination
“...ambitious intelligence [is] a force that can demolish the 'heart's reasons' — namely, a warm empathy, a considerateness toward others, a willingness, even, to let them become one's teachers, however humble or troubled their lives.”
Robert Coles, M.D., The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination
“read to each other from novels by George Eliot and Dickens and Hardy and Tolstoy during my elementary school years. My brother Bill (now a professor of English)”
Robert Coles, The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination