Nature and the Human Soul Quotes

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Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World by Bill Plotkin
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Nature and the Human Soul Quotes Showing 1-11 of 11
“Remember that self-doubt is as self-centered as self-inflation. Your obligation is to reach as deeply as you can and offer your unique and authentic gifts as bravely and beautifully as you're able.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“... to wander far from the familiar "home" of his adolescent ways of belonging, doing, and being. He must, as poet Mary Oliver puts it, "stride deeper and deeper into the world." His culture will greatly influence the manner in which he wanders, as will his gender, physical constitution, psychological temperament, age, and bio-region. In one culture, his wandering might take him geographically far from his hometown or village. In another culture, geographic movement will have little importance for the true depth of his wandering. What is critical is not whether he engages in this practice or that, or undergoes this ritual or another, but that his wandering changes his relationship to the world, that he leaves the home of his adolescent identity, and that his border crossings usher him into the mysteries of nature and psyché.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“As soon as enough people in contemporary societies progress beyond adolescence, the entire consumer-driven economy and egocentric lifestyle will implode. The adolescent society is actually quite unstable due to its incongruence with the primary patterns of living systems. The industrial growth society is simply incompatible with collective human maturity. No true adult wants to be a consumer, worker bee, or tycoon, or a soldier in an imperial war, and none would go through these motions if there were other options at hand. The enlivened soul and wild nature are deadly to industrial growth economies - and vice versa.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“Given that the human soul is the very core of our human nature, we might note that, when we are guided by soul, we are guided by nature. Both soul and greater nature do guide us in our individual development, whether or not we ask for this guidance.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“The soul faithfully comes to our aid through dreams, deep emotion, love, the quiet voice of guidance, synchronicities, revelations, hunches, and visions, and at times through illness, nightmares, and terrors.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“Nature, too, supports our personal blossoming (if we have any quiet exposure to her) through her spontaneities, through her beauty, power, and mirroring, through her dazzling variety of species and habitats, and by way of the wind, Moon, Sun, stars, and galaxies.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“Arrested personal growth serves industrial "growth". By suppressing the nature dimension of human development (through educational systems, social values, advertising, nature-eclipsing vocations and pastimes, city and suburb design, denatured medical and psychological practices, and other means), industrial growth society engenders an immature citizenry unable to imagine a life beyond consumerism and soul-suppressing jobs.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“Having lost the training and rites that prepare a girl for becoming truly queenly, a mature woman, we have instead beauty-queen contests for five-year-olds.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“What we need now are new stories to share with each other, new tales to live into the world, which is to say, stories to make real by living our own versions of them.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“In this tiny interval of the twenty-first century, we, the human species, will either learn to become a life-enhancing element within the greater Earth community . . . or we will not. If we fail, humanity will be reduced to a small number, we will have forsaken our potential as a species (this time around, at least) and we will have perpetrated the extinction of many thousands of species, perhaps millions — beyond those that have already perished at our hands. And yet we now behold the possibility of a radical and foundational shift in human culture — from a suicidal, life-destroying element to a way of life worthy of our unique human potential and of Earth's dream for itself. What lies before us is the opportunity and imperative for a thorough cultural transformation — what eco-philosopher Joanna Macy calls the Great Turning, the transition from an egocentric “Industrial Growth Society” to a soulcentric “Life-sustaining Society,” or what economist David Korten in The Great Turning calls the transition “from Empire to Earth Community.” The cultural historian Thomas Berry refers to this vital endeavor as the Great Work of our time.2 It is every person's responsibility and privilege to contribute to this metamorphosis. Transformational”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World
“Soul has been demoted to a new-age spiritual fantasy or a missionary's booty, and nature has been treated , at best, as a postcard or a vacation backdrop or, more commonly, as a hardware store or refuse heap. Too many of us lack intimacy with the natural world and with our souls, and consequently we are doing untold damage to both.”
Bill Plotkin, Nature and the Human Soul: Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World