Thoughts in Solitude Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Thoughts in Solitude Thoughts in Solitude by Thomas Merton
1,817 ratings, 4.22 average rating, 119 reviews
Open Preview
Thoughts in Solitude Quotes Showing 1-30 of 64
“My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so. But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing. I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire. And I know that if I do this you will lead me by the right road though I may know nothing about it. Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death. I will not fear, for you are ever with me, and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“If a man is to live, he must be all alive, body, soul, mind, heart, spirit.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“If our life is poured out in useless words, we will never hear anything, never become anything, and in the end, because we have said everything before we had anything to say, we shall be left speechless at the moment of our greatest decision.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Ask me not where I live or what I like to eat . . . Ask me what I am living for and what I think is keeping me from living fully that.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Violence is not completely fatal until it ceases to disturb us.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“A purely mental life may be destructive if it leads us to substitute thought for life and ideas for actions. The activity proper to man is purely mental because man is not just a disembodied mind. Our destiny is to live out what we think, because unless we live what we know, we do not even know it. It is only by making our knowledge part of ourselves, through action, that we enter into the reality that is signified by our concepts.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“The spiritual life is first of all a life. It is not merely something to be known and studied, it is to be lived.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“When society is made up of men who know no interior solitude it can no longer be held together by love: and consequently it is held together by a violent and abusive authority. But when men are violently deprived of the solitude and freedom which are their due, then society in which they live becomes putrid, it festers with servility, resentment and hate.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“The only thing to seek in contemplative prayer is God; and we seek Him successfully when we realize that we cannot find Him unless He shows Himself to us, and yet at the same time that He would not have inspired us to seek Him unless we had already found Him.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Words stand between silence and silence: between the silence of things and the silence of our own being. Between the silence of the world and the silence of God. When we have really met and known the world in silence, words do not separate us from the world nor from other men, nor from God, nor from ourselves because we no longer trust entirely in language to contain reality.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Those who are not grateful soon begin to complain of everything.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“There is no greater disaster in the spiritual life than to be immersed in unreality, for life is maintained and nourished in us by our vital relation with realities outside and above us.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“It is not speaking that breaks our silence, but the anxiety to be heard. The words of the proud man impose silence on all others, so that he alone may be heard. The humble man speaks only in order to be spoken to.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“If we want to be spiritual, then, let us first of all live our lives. Let us not fear the responsibilities and the inevitable distractions of the work appointed for us by the will of God.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts In Solitude
“Christianity is not stoicism. The Cross does not sanctify us by destroying human feeling. Detachment is not insensibility. Too many ascetics fail to become great saints precisely because their rules and ascetic practices have merely deadened their humanity instead of setting it free to develop richly, in all its capacities, under the influence of grace.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts In Solitude
“What is the use of praying if at the very moment of prayer, we have so little confidence in God that we are busy planning our own kind of answer to our prayer?”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Some men turn away from all this cheap emotion with a kind of heroic despair…But this too can be an error. For if our emotions really die in the desert, our humanity dies with them.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“We are not meant to resolve all contradictions but to live with them and rise above them and see them in the light of exterior and objective values which make them trivial by comparison.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“This, then, is our desert: to live facing despair, but not to consent. To trample it down under hope in the Cross. To wage war against despair unceasingly.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Our destiny is to live out what we think, because unless we live what we know, we do not even know it. It is only by making our knowledge part of ourselves, through action, that we enter into the reality that is signified by our concepts.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“The whole of life is to spiritualize our activities by humility and faith, to silence our nature by charity.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Great though books may be, friends though they may be to us, they are no substitute for persons, they are only means of contact with great persons...”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“For true humility is, in a way, a very real despair: despair of myself, in order that I may hope entirely in You.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“The humble man also loves himself, and seeks to be loved and honored, not because love and honor are due to him but because they are not due to him. He seeks to be loved by the mercy of God.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Life is not attained by reasoning and analysis but first of all by living.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“What we venerate in the Saints, beyond and above all that we know is this secret; the mystery of an innocence and of an identity perfectly hidden in God.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts In Solitude
“If our life is poured out in useless words, we will never hear anything, will never become anything, and in the end, because have said everything before we had anything to say, we shall be left speechless at the moment of our greatest decision.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Suppose that my "poverty" be a secret hunger for spiritual riches: suppose that by pretending to empty myself, pretending to be silent, I am really trying to cajole God into enriching me with some experience--what then? Then everything becomes a distraction.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Vào một thời đại khi chính thể chuyên chế thao túng mọi cách hầu làm mất giá trị và nhân phẩm, chúng ta tin chắc rằng, tiếng nói của những ai ủng hộ sự tĩnh lặng và tự do bên trong của con người đều cần được lắng nghe.

Tiếng ầm ĩ giết người của chủ nghĩa duy vật nơi chúng ta không được phép dập tắt những tiếng nói vốn sẽ không bao giờ ngưng vang lên: liệu chúng có phải là tiếng nói của các Thánh Kitô Hữu, tiếng nói của những nhà thông thái Phương Đông như Lão Tử hay các Thiền sư, tiếng nói của những người như Thoreau hay Martin Buber, hay Max Picard. Hoàn toàn đúng khi nhấn mạnh rằng, con người là một “con vật xã hội” – sự thật đủ cho thấy. Nhưng đó không phải là lý do để biện hộ cho việc biến con người thành một bánh xe nhỏ trong một guồng máy chuyên chế – hay một bánh xe tôn giáo trước vấn đề đó.

Thật ra, sự tồn tại của một xã hội tuỳ thuộc vào sự trầm lắng riêng tư bất khả xâm phạm của các thành viên trong đó. Để xứng đáng với tên gọi của mình, xã hội được cấu thành không phải từ những con số hay những đơn vị máy móc, nhưng bởi những nhân vị. Việc trở thành một nhân vị bao hàm trách nhiệm và tự do. Cả hai điều này lại muốn nói đến một sự tĩnh lặng bên trong nào đó, một ý thức về sự chính trực cá nhân, ý thức về thực tại riêng tư cũng như khả năng của mỗi người để trao ban chính mình cho xã hội – hay để từ chối quà tặng đó.

Bị nhấn chìm hoàn toàn trong một biển người vô danh, bị xô đẩy dồn ép bởi những thế lực vô thức, con người đánh mất nhân tính đích thực, đánh mất sự chính trực, đánh mất khả năng yêu thương và khả năng tự quyết của mình. Khi xã hội được cấu thành bởi những con người vốn không biết sự tĩnh lặng bên trong là gì, xã hội đó không còn được liên kết với nhau bằng tình yêu. Do đó, nó được nối kết với nhau bởi một thứ quyền lực lạm dụng và bạo lực. Khi con người bị cưỡng bách để rồi mất đi sự tĩnh lặng và tự do lẽ ra họ đáng được, thì xã hội trong đó họ đang sống lại trở nên đồi bại, thối rữa bởi sự hèn hạ, căm phẫn và hận thù.

Không khối tiến bộ kỹ thuật nào có thể chữa lành mối thù hằn vốn ăn mòn nhựa sống của một xã hội duy vật tựa hồ căn bệnh ung thư thiêng liêng. Phương pháp trị liệu duy nhất là, và phải luôn luôn là, thiêng liêng. Nói thật nhiều về Thiên Chúa và tình yêu cho con người sẽ trở nên một việc vô bổ nếu họ không có khả năng lắng nghe. Đôi tai mà nhờ đó, người ta lắng nghe thông điệp của Tin Mừng đang ẩn tàng trong tâm hồn con người, và những đôi tai này không nghe bất cứ điều gì trừ phi chúng được ưu đãi với một sự trầm lắng và tĩnh lặng bên trong nào đó.

Nói cách khác, vì đức tin là một vấn đề thuộc tự do và tự quyết – đón nhận nhưng không quà tặng ân sủng được trao ban cách nhưng không – con người không thể chấp nhận một thông điệp thiêng liêng bao lâu tâm hồn và trí óc nó còn là nô lệ của hành động vô ý thức. Con người sẽ luôn là nô lệ chừng nào nó vẫn đắm chìm trong khối những cổ người máy khác, hoặc chừng nào nó không còn tính cá vị hay sự chính trực đúng đắn của mình với tư cách là những nhân vị.

Những gì được nói ở đây về sự cô tịch không chỉ là một giải pháp cho các nhà ẩn tu, nó còn liên quan đến toàn thể tương lai của con người và số phận của thế giới trong đó nó đang sống; và đặc biệt, dĩ nhiên, đến tương lai đời sống tôn giáo của nó.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
“Mọi tâm hồn chiêm niệm đích thực có chung điểm này: không phải vì họ quy tụ cách riêng biệt trong sa mạc hoặc tự giam mình trong ẩn dật, nhưng vì rằng, Ngài ở đâu, họ ở đó. Và bằng cách nào họ tìm thấy Ngài? Bằng kỹ thuật? Không kỹ thuật nào dành cho việc tìm kiếm Ngài. Họ tìm Ngài do Ý Muốn của Ngài. Và ý muốn của Ngài là đem cho họ ân sủng, sắp xếp đời sống của họ, mang họ đến đúng nơi chốn, ở đó, họ có thể tìm thấy Ngài. Cả khi đã ở đó, họ cũng không biết họ đến đó bằng cách nào và đang thực sự làm gì.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude

« previous 1 3