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What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People by Joe Navarro
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What Every Body is Saying Quotes Showing 1-30 of 57
“The problem is that most people spend their lives looking but not truly seeing, or, as Sherlock Holmes, the meticulous English detective, declared to his partner, Dr. Watson, “You see, but you do not observe.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Because we are social animals, we not only lie for our own benefit, but we lie for the benefit of each other (Vrij, 2003, 3–11).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“For instance, when people press their lips together in a manner that seems to make them disappear, it is a clear and common sign that they are troubled and something is wrong.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“We lie with our faces because that’s what we’ve been taught to do since early childhood. “Don’t make that face,” our parents growl when we honestly react to the food placed in front of us. “At least look happy when your cousins stop by,” they instruct, and you learn to force a smile. Our parents—and society—are, in essence, telling us to hide, deceive, and lie with our faces for the sake of social harmony. So it is no surprise that we tend to get pretty good at it, so good, in fact, that when we put on a happy face at a family gathering, we might look as if we love our in-laws when, in reality, we are fantasizing about how to hasten their departure.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Research tells us liars tend to gesture less, touch less, and move their arms and legs less than honest people (Vrij, 2003, 65).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“If you currently travel abroad or plan to in the future, make sure you understand the cultural convention of the country that you are visiting. Particularly with regard to greetings. If someone gives you a weak hand-shake, don't grimace. If anyone takes your arm, don't wince. If you are in the Middle East and a person wants to hold your hand, hold it. If you are a man visiting Russia, don't be surprised when your male host kisses your cheek, rather than hand. All of these greetings are as natural as way to express genuine sentiments as an American handshake. I am honored when an Arab or Asian man offers to take my hand because I know that it is a sign of high respect and trust. Accepting these cultural differences is the first step to better understanding and embracing diversity.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Dr. Watson, “You see, but you do not observe.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“If you are a parent, teacher, camp counselor, or school resource officer and you see children severely change or restrain their arm behavior around their parents or other adults, at a minimum it should arouse your interest and promote further observation. Cessation of arm movement is part of the limbic system’s freeze response. To the abused child, this adaptive behavior can mean survival.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Eye blocking is a very powerful display of consternation, disbelief, or disagreement.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Neck touching takes place when there is emotional discomfort, doubt, or insecurity.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“there is no single behavior that is indicative of deception—not one (Ekman, 1991, 162–189).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Violations of personal space cause us to become hypervigilant; our pulse races and we may become flushed (Knapp & Hall, 2002, 146–147).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“ticket agents can often identify passengers who will become problematic by how wide they position their arms when they are at the counter.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Because the neocortex (the thinking brain) is capable of dishonesty, it is not a good source of reliable or accurate information (Ost, 2006, 259”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Just as careful listening is critical to understanding our verbal pronouncements, so careful observation is vital to comprehending our body language.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Commandment 2: Observing in context is key to understanding nonverbal behavior.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“You see, but you do not observe.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“It is estimated that humans are capable of more than ten thousand different facial expressions (Ekman, 2003, 14–15).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“We all have a stake in the truth. Society functions based on an assumption that people will abide by their word - that truth prevails over mendacity. For the most part, it does. If it didn't, relationships would have a short shelf life, commerce would cease, and trust between parents and children would be destroyed. All of us depend on honesty, because when truth is lacking we suffer, and society suffers. When Adolf Hitler lied to Neville Chamberlain, there was not peace in our time, and over fifty million people paid the price with their lives. When Richard Nixon lied to the nation, it destroyed the respect many had for the office of the president. When Enron executives lied to their employees, thousands of lives were ruined overnight. We count on our government and commercial institutions to be honest and truthful. We need and expect our friends and family to be truthful. Truth is essential for all relations be they personal, professional, or civic.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
tags: truth
“For our purposes, any touching of the face, head, neck, shoulder, arm, hand, or leg in response to a negative stimulus (e.g., a difficult question, an embarrassing situation, or stress as a result of something heard, seen, or thought) is a pacifying behavior. These stroking behaviors don’t help us to solve problems; rather, they help us to remain calm while we do. In other words, they soothe us. Men prefer to touch their faces. Women prefer to touch their necks, clothing, jewelry, arms, and hair.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“By examining what’s normal, we begin to recognize and identify what’s abnormal.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Even the vaunted polygraph is accurate only 60 to 80 percent of the time, depending on the operator of the instrument (Ford, 1996, 230–232; Cumming, 2007).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Nonverbal behaviors comprise approximately 60 to 65 percent of all interpersonal communication and, during lovemaking, can constitute 100 percent of communication between partners (Burgoon, 1994, 229–285).”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Eye-blocking” is a nonverbal behavior that can occur when we feel threatened and/or don’t like what we see. Squinting (as in the case with my classmates, described above) and closing or shielding our eyes are actions that have evolved to protect the brain from “seeing” undesirable images and to communicate our disdain toward others.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Commandment 5: When you interact with others, try to establish their baseline behaviors”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“Commandment 7: It’s important to look for changes in a person’s behavior that can signal changes in thoughts, emotions, interest, or intent.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“In order to gain knowledge about a person through nonverbal pacifiers, there are a few guidelines you need to follow: (1) Recognize pacifying behaviors when they occur. I have provided you with all of the major pacifiers. As you make a concerted effort to spot these body signals, they will become increasingly easy to recognize in interactions with other people. (2) Establish a pacifying baseline for an individual. That way you can note any increase and/or intensity in that person’s pacifying behaviors and react accordingly. (3) When you see a person make a pacifying gesture, stop and ask yourself, “What caused him to do that?” You know the individual feels uneasy about something. Your job, as a collector of nonverbal intelligence, is to find out what that something is. (4) Understand that pacifying behaviors almost always are used to calm a person after a stressful event occurs. Thus, as a general principle, you can assume that if an individual is engaged in pacifying behavior, some stressful event or stimulus has preceded it and caused it to happen. (5) The ability to link a pacifying behavior with the specific stressor that caused it can help you better understand the person with whom you are interacting. (6) In certain circumstances you can actually say or do something to see if it stresses an individual (as reflected in an increase in pacifying behaviors) to better understand his thoughts and intentions. (7) Note what part of the body a person pacifies. This is significant, because the higher the stress, the greater the amount of facial or neck stroking is involved. (8) Remember, the greater the stress or discomfort, the greater the likelihood of pacifying behaviors to follow. Pacifiers are a great way to assess for comfort and discomfort. In a sense, pacifying behaviors are “supporting players” in our limbic reactions. Yet they reveal much about our emotional state and how we are truly feeling.”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“back of the other person. Unfortunately, I know a lot of people who are reluctant to do this and/or feel very awkward when”
Joe Navarro, What Every Body is Saying: An FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People
“When we are around someone who arouses us, our blink rate also tends to increase.”
Joe Navarro, What Every BODY is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People

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