The Winter King Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur (The Warlord Chronicles, #1) The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur by Bernard Cornwell
34,409 ratings, 4.27 average rating, 1,556 reviews
Open Preview
The Winter King Quotes Showing 1-30 of 49
“But fate, as Merlin always taught us, is inexorable. Life is a jest of the Gods, Merlin liked to claim, and there is no justice. You must learn to laugh, he once told me, or else you'll just weep yourself to death.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“I do understand that you can look into someone’s eyes,” I heard myself saying, “and suddenly know that life will be impossible without them. Know that their voice can make your heart miss a beat and that their company is all your happiness can ever desire and that their absence will leave your soul alone, bereft and lost.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
tags: love
“The bards sing of love, they celebrate slaughter, they extol kings and flatter queens, but were I a poet I would write in praise of friendship.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Fate is inexorable.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“If you can master me, that look seemed to say, then you can master whatever else this wicked world might bring. I can see her now, standing amidst her deerhounds that had the same thin, lean bodies, and the same long nose and the same huntess eyes as their mistress. Green eyes, she had, with a kind of cruelty deep inside them. It was not a soft face, any more that her body was soft. She was a woman of strong lines and high bones, and that made for a good face and a handsome one, but hard, so hard. What made her beautiful was her hair and her carriage, for she stood as straight as spear and her hair fell around her shoulders like a cascade of tumbling red tangles. That red hair softened her looks, while her laughter snared men like salmon caught in basket traps. There have been many more beautiful women, and thousands who were better, but since the world was weaned I doubt there have been many more so unforgettable as Guinevere, eldest daughter of Leodegan, the exiled King of Henis Wyren.
And it would have been better, Merlin always said, had she been drowned at birth.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“How much of our earth has been wet by blood because of jealousy! And at the end of life, what does it all matter? We grow old and the young look at us and can never see that once we made a kingdom ring for love.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Madness ends sometimes. The Gods decree it, not man.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“To ask another man’s blessing is simply to avoid taking the responsibility.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“One of the things I can’t stand about Christians is their admiration of meekness. Imagine elevating meekness into a virtue! Meekness! Can you imagine a heaven filled only with the meek? What a dreadful idea. The food would get cold while everyone passed the dishes to everyone else. Meekness is no good, Derfel. Anger and selfishness, those are the qualities that make the world march.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Os bardos cantam sobre o amor e sobre como as mulheres desejam o amor, mas ninguém sabe o que ele é até que, como uma lança atirada do escuro, ele acerta.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
tags: amor
“Are all Dumnonian warriors so ill-mannered?" she asked the table at large in an acid voice.

"You want warriors to be courtiers?" Celwin retorted brusquely. "You'd send your precious poets to kill the Franks? And I don't mean by reciting their verses at them, though come to think of it that might be quite effective." He leered at the Queen and the three poets shuddered.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“You're not a Christian, are you?"

"No."

"You should consider it. We may not offer too many earthly delights, but our lives after death are certainly worth having.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Poor Uther. He believed that virtues are handed down through a man's loins! What nonsense! A child is like a calf; if the thing is born crippled you knock it smartly on the skull and serve the cow again. That's why the Gods made it such a pleasure to engender children, because so many of the little brutes have to be replaced. There's not much pleasure in the process for women, of course, but someone has to suffer and
thank the Gods it's them and not us.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“I believe the Gods hate to be bored, so I do my best to amuse them. That way they smile on me. Your God,’ Merlin said sourly, ‘despises amusement, demanding grovelling worship instead. He must be a very sorry creature.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“A vida é uma brincadeira dos deuses e não existe justiça. Você precisa aprender a rir ou então vai simplesmente chorar até morrer.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“The sword was called Kaledvoulc'h, which means hard lightning, though Igraine prefers to call it Excaliber, and I shall call it so as well because Arthur never cared what name his longsword carried. Nor, did he care about his childhood, for certainly I never heard him speak of it. I once questioned him about his early days and he would not answer. “What is the egg to the eagle?” he asked me, then said that he had been born, he had lived, and he had become a soldier, and that was all I needed to know.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Nor did he care about his childhood, for certainly I never heard him speak of it. I once questioned him about his early days and he would not answer. ‘What is the egg to the eagle?’ he asked me…”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“That man is my Arthur, a great warlord and a hero who fought against impossible odds to such effect that even fifteen hundred years later his enemies love and revere his memory.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Dizem que este Deus (deus cristão) é do perdão. Melhor ofender um desses do que qualquer outro.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“The Gods play games with us, but if we open ourselves then we can become a part of the game instead of its victims.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Madness has a purpose! It’s a gift from the Gods, and like all their gifts it comes with a price,”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Mais tarde, muito mais tarde, aprendi que a alegria e o medo são exatamente a mesma coisa, uma apenas se transformava na outra pela ação, mas”
Bernard Cornwell, O rei do inverno
“And at the end of life, what does it all matter? We grow old and the young look at us and can never see that once we made a kingdom ring for love.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“of every night you must be open to the Gods, and if”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“For Arthur, at last, had come.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“To fight battles, Derfel,’ he corrected me, ‘on behalf of people who can’t fight for themselves. I learned that in Brittany. This miserable world is full of weak people, powerless people, hungry people, sad people, sick people, poor people, and it’s the easiest thing in the world to despise the weak,”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“It was, predictably, a morning ceremony, for nothing good comes of endeavours undertaken when the sun is in decline,”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Children born to unwed mothers,’ he said after a long silence, ‘have parts of their souls missing.”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Some Gods are wicked, Derfel. And besides, they have no duty to us, only we to them. Maybe it amused them?”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur
“Nor did he care about his childhood, for certainly I never heard him speak of it. I once questioned him about his early days and he would not answer. ‘What is the egg to the eagle?’ he asked me, then said he had been born, he had lived and he had become a soldier, and that was all I needed to know. (p97)”
Bernard Cornwell, The Winter King: A Novel of Arthur

« previous 1