The Heart of Yoga Quotes

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The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice by T.K.V. Desikachar
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The Heart of Yoga Quotes Showing 1-21 of 21
“Whenever you are in doubt, it is best to pause. Few things are so pressing that they cannot wait for a moment of breath.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“The guru is not one who says, “I am the guru.” There are great stories in the Upaniṣads of the guru who rejected the very idea of teaching. One of the qualities of a person who is clear, who is wise, is not to need to say “I am clear, I am wise.” There is no need to say this.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“In education the first requirement is the teacher, the second is the student. What should happen between them is learning. How it should happen is through the constant teaching of that which will be relevant to the student. That is education.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“prāṇāyāma is first and foremost to give us many different possibilities for following the breath. When we follow the breath, the mind will be drawn into the activities of the breath. In this way prāṇāyāma prepares us for the stillness of meditation.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Another meaning of the word yoga is “to tie the strands of the mind together.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“However powerful or disturbing something may appear to be, it is our reaction to it that determines its effects.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Taking an intelligent approach means working toward your goal step by step.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“it is indeed true that by practicing yoga we gradually improve our ability to concentrate and to be independent. We improve our health, our relationships, and everything we do.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“The breath relates directly to the mind and to our prāṇa, but we should not therefore imagine that as we inhale, prāṇa simply flows into us. This is not the case. Prāṇa enters the body in the moment when there is a positive change in the mind.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“La recomendación de una práctica regular de yoga sigue el principio de que, a través de la práctica, podemos aprender a estar presentes en todo momento y de esta forma, lograr mucho de lo que antes éramos incapaces de hacer.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, El corazón del Yoga: Desarrollando una práctica personal
“Ha represents iḍā and the cool energy of the moon (candra); ṭha represents piṅgalā and the hot energy of the sun (sūrya).”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“What possibilities are there for preventing actions with negative consequences, actions that we may later regret? One possibility is dhyāna, which in this context means “reflection.”3 Reflection can take many forms. For example, when faced with an important decision, you could imagine what would happen if you did the exact opposite of what your instincts suggest.4 Try to make the consequence of your decision as real as possible in your imagination. No matter what it is or what you feel, before you make an important decision and take action you should give yourself the opportunity to consider the matter with an open mind and a certain degree of objectivity. Dhyāna in this respect is a quiet, alert consideration, a meditation. The aim is to free yourself of preconceptions and avoid actions that you may later regret and that may create new troubles (duḥkha) for you. Dhyāna strengthens self-sufficiency. Yoga makes us independent. We all want to be free, although many of us are dependent on psychologists, gurus, teachers, drugs, or whatever. Even if advice and guidance are helpful, in the end we ourselves are the best judge of our own actions. No one is more interested in me than me. With the help of dhyāna we find our own methods and systems for making decisions and better understand our behavior. There are other ways of distancing ourselves from our actions than reflecting on how it would be if we were to act differently from what we intend. We might go to a concert or go for a walk or do something else that calms the thoughts. All the while the mind goes on working unconsciously, without any external pressure. In the pursuit of other activities we gain a certain distance. However short it may be, time becomes available to cast the mind over everything surrounding the decision that has to be made. Perhaps with ease and distance we will make a better decision. Stepping out of a situation in order to get a better look at it from another standpoint is called pratipakṣa. The same word describes the process of considering other possible courses of action.5 The time spent in dhyāna is extremely important. Through self-reflection our actions gain in quality.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“The mind, which is subject to change, and the Perceiver, which is not, are in proximity but are of distinct and different characters. When the mind is directed externally and acts mechanically toward objects there is either pleasure or pain. When at the appropriate time, however, an individual begins inquiry into the very nature of the link between the Perceiver and perception the mind is disconnected from external objects and there arises the understanding of the Perceiver itself. Under”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Lo yoga non è passivo. Dobbiamo partecipare alla vita. Per farlo bene, dobbiamo lavorare su noi stessi”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Having a point of reference is absolutely necessary. We need somebody who can hold a mirror in front of us. Otherwise we very quickly begin to imagine that we are perfect and know it all. This personal connection cannot be replaced by books or videos. There must be a relationship, a real relationship, one that is based on trust. Q:”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Desikachar helps us realize that what is essential in the practice of yoga is the breath because each pose, each movement, originates from there.”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“The first step is to recognize that certain tendencies of our mind are responsible for producing painful effects. If these tendencies are not curtailed, we may reach a point of no return. 2.28”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Another aspect of yoga has to do with our actions. Yoga therefore also means acting in such a way that all of our attention is directed toward the activity in which we are currently engaged. Suppose for example that while I am writing, one part of my mind is thinking about what I want to say while another part is thinking about something entirely different. The more I am focused on my writing, the greater my attentiveness to my action in this moment. The exact opposite might also occur: I might begin writing with great attention, but as I continue to write my attention begins to waver. I might begin to think about the plans I have for the day tomorrow, or what is cooking for dinner. It then appears as if I am acting with attentiveness, but really I am paying little attention to the task at hand. I am functioning, but I am not present. Yoga attempts to create a state in which we are always present—really present—in every action, in every moment. The advantage of attentiveness is that we perform each task better and at the same time are conscious of our actions. The possibility of making mistakes becomes correspondingly smaller the more our attention develops. When we are attentive to our actions we are not prisoners to our habits; we do not need to do something today simply because we did it yesterday. Instead there is the possibility of considering our actions fresh and so avoiding thoughtless repetition. Another”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“There are eight components of Yoga. These are: yama, our attitudes toward our environment. niyama, our attitudes toward ourselves. āsana, the practice of body exercises. prāṇāyāma, the practice of breathing exercises. pratyāhāra, the restraint of our senses. dhārāna, the ability to direct our minds. dhyāna, the ability to develop interactions with what we seek to understand. samādhi, complete integration with the object to be understood. The”
T.K.V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice
“Avidyā es la raíz que causa los obstáculos que nos impiden reconocer las cosas como en realidad son. Los obstáculos son: asmitā (ego), rāga (apego), dveṣa (rechazo) y abhiniveśa (miedo)”
T.K.V. Desikachar, El corazón del Yoga: Desarrollando una práctica personal
“In 1939 and 1940, Krishnamacharya was visited by a French medical team who wanted to verify that an experienced yogi could deliberately stop his heartbeat. For Śrī Krishnamacharya, this muchmarvelled-at examination was a rather bothersome demonstration, one that he undertook out of feeling responsible to validate yoga in the eyes of the skeptical scientific world.”
T. K. V. Desikachar, The Heart of Yoga: Developing a Personal Practice