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The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home by Dan Ariely
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The Upside of Irrationality Quotes Showing 1-30 of 38
“To summarize, using money to motivate people can be a double-edged sword. For tasks that require cognitive ability, low to moderate performance-based incentives can help. But when the incentive level is very high, it can command too much attention and thereby distract the person’s mind with thoughts about the reward. This can create stress and ultimately reduce the level of performance.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“...[D]ivision of labor, in my mind, is one of the dangers of work-based technology. Modern IT infrastructure allows us to break projects into very small, discrete parts and assign each person to do only one of the many parts. In so doing, companies run the risk of taking away employees' sense of the big picture, purpose, and sense of completion.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“It is very difficult to make really big,
important, life-changing decisions because we are all susceptible
to a formidable array of decision biases. There are more of them
than we realize, and they come to visit us more often than we
like to admit.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“...[T]he distance Boston drivers generally maintain from the car in front of them is visible only with a good microscope.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Upton Sinclair once noted, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”)”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Man is a pliant animal, a being who gets accustomed to anything. —FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“I do believe that an improved understanding of the multiple irrational forces that influence us could be a useful first step toward making better decisions.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“The effort that we put into something does not just change the object. It changes us and the way we evaluate that object. Greater labor leads to greater love. Our overvaluation of the things we make runs so deep that we assume that others share our biased perspective. When we cannot complete something into which we have put great effort, we don’t feel so attached to it.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“One fall day in Boston, a tall mechanical engineering student named Joe entered the student union at Harvard University. He was all ambition and acne”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“there is a great deal to be learned from rational economics, but some of its assumptions—that people always make the best decisions, that mistakes are less likely when the decisions involve a lot of money, and that the market is self-correcting—can clearly lead to disastrous consequences.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“We are more than height, weight, religion, and income. Others judge us on the basis of general subjective and aesthetic attributes, such as our manner of speaking and our sense of humor. We are also a scent, a sparkle of the eye, a sweep of the hand, the sound of a laugh, and the knit of a brow—ineffable qualities that can’t easily be captured in a database.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Most blogs have very low readership—perhaps only the blogger’s mother or best friend reads them—but even writing for one person, compared to writing for nobody, seems to be enough to compel millions of people to blog.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“ON AN INTUITIVE level, most of us understand the deep interconnection between identity and labor. Children think of their potential future occupations in terms of what they will be (firemen, teachers, doctors, behavioral economists, or what have you), not about the amount of money they will earn.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“If companies really want their workers to produce, they should try to impart a sense of meaning—not just through vision statements but by allowing employees to feel a sense of completion and ensuring that a job well done is acknowledged. At the end of the day, such factors can exert a huge influence on satisfaction and productivity.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“the translation of joy into willingness to work seems to depend to a large degree on how much meaning we can attribute to our own labor.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“we don’t assume that people are perfectly sensible, calculating machines. Instead, we observe how people actually behave, and quite often our observations lead us to the conclusion that human beings are irrational.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“I am not sure who started this chicken-and-egg problem, but as we consumers encounter offensive service, we become angrier and tend to take it out on the next service provider—whether or not he or she is responsible for our bad experience. The people receiving our emotional outbursts then go on to serve other customers, but because they are in a worse mood themselves, they aren’t in a position to be courteous and polite. And so goes the carousel of annoyance, frustration, and revenge in an ever-escalating cycle.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“In the end, our research findings suggest that the online market for single people should be structured with an understanding of what people can and can’t naturally do. It should use technology in ways that are congruent with what we are naturally good at and help us with the tasks that don’t fit with our innate abilities.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“and, much as in real dating, experience something together. If so inclined, she might even suggest that they try to play some online games together, explore magical kingdoms, slay dragons, and solve problems.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Jensen discovered (and many subsequent experiments confirmed) that many animals—including fish, birds, gerbils, rats, mice, monkeys, and chimpanzees—tend to prefer a longer, more indirect route to food than a shorter, more direct one.* That is, as long as fish, birds, gerbils, rats, mice, monkeys, and chimpanzees don’t have to work too hard, they frequently prefer to earn their food. In fact, among all the animals tested so far the only species that prefers the lazy route is—you guessed it—the commendably rational cat.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“THIS EXPERIMENT TAUGHT US that sucking the meaning out of work is surprisingly easy. If you’re a manager who really wants to demotivate your employees, destroy their work in front of their eyes. Or, if you want to be a little subtler about it, just ignore them and their efforts. On the other hand, if you want to motivate people working with you and for you, it would be useful to pay attention to them, their effort, and the fruits of their labor.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“The results were very clear. The men kept their hands in the tub much longer than the women. At the start of the next class I eagerly raised my hand and told Professor Weiner and the whole class about my results. Unfazed and without losing a beat, she told me that all I’d proven was that men were idiots. “Why would anybody,” she sneered, “keep their hand in hot water for your study? If there was a real goal to the pain, you would see what women are truly capable of.” I learned some important lessons that day about science, and also about women. I also learned that if someone believes something strongly, it is very difficult to convince him or her otherwise.*”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Az egyik ilyen látogatás alkalmával megemlítettem Hanannak, hogy nemrégiben fogorvosnál jártam, és nem kértem sem lidokaint, sem bármilyen más érzéstelenítést a fúráshoz. „Érdekes élmény volt – meséltem. – Egyértelműen fájdalmas, és éreztem, amikor a fúró elérte az ideget, de nem zavart különösebben.”
Hanan meglepődött, és elmesélte, hogy a balesete óta ő sem kér érzéstelenítést a fogorvosnál. Ezt követően eltöprengtünk azon, hogy vajon csupán két furcsamód mazochista egyén vagyunk-e, vagy az a tény tette kevésbé ijesztővé a fogfúrás viszonylag jelentéktelen eseményét, hogy korábban mindketten hosszú ideig tartó fájdalmakat éltünk át. Ösztönösen, és talán egotista módon abban állapodtunk meg, hogy valószínűleg ez utóbbiról van szó.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Ám az a helyzet, hogy bár kiválóan el tudjuk képzelni a jövőt, azt nem láthatjuk előre, miként alkalmazkodunk majd hozzá.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“There was no escape from realizing that my market value for romantic partners had vastly diminished, but at the same time I felt that only one part of me, my physical appearance, was damaged. I didn’t feel that I (the real me) had changed in any meaningful way, which made it all the more difficult to accept the idea that I was suddenly less valuable.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“THE GENERAL IDEA of contrafreeloading contradicts the simple economic view that organisms will always choose to maximize their reward while minimizing their effort.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“*In general, we are often overly focused on endings when we evaluate overall experiences. From this perspective, a cake at the end of a meal is of particular importance.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“But as the level of the base motivation increases, adding incentives can backfire and reduce performance, creating what psychologists often call an “inverse-U relationship.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“Speaking of interruptions, think about television. We spend all kinds of money on gadgets and services such as TiVo to keep commercials out of our lives. But could we possibly enjoy the latest installment of Lost or House even more with the periodic interruptions of commercials? Leif, Tom, and Jeff Galak had the gall to test this. They discovered that when people are watching uninterrupted TV programs, their pleasure diminishes as the show goes on. But when the show is interrupted by commercial breaks, the pleasure level increases.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home
“An NBA clutch player can either improve his percentage success (which would indicate a sharpening of performance) or shoot more often with the same percentage (which suggests no improvement in skill but rather a change in the number of attempts). So we looked separately at whether the clutch players actually shot better or just more often. As it turned out, the clutch players did not improve their skill; they just tried many more times. Their field goal percentage did not increase in the last five minutes (meaning that their shots were no more accurate); neither was it the case that nonclutch players got worse. At this point you probably think that clutch players are guarded more heavily during the end of the game and this is why they don’t show the expected increase in performance. To see if this were indeed the case, we counted how many times they were fouled and also looked at their free throws. We found the same pattern: the heavily guarded clutch players were fouled more and got to shoot from the free-throw line more frequently, but their scoring percentage was unchanged. Certainly, clutch players are very good players, but our analysis showed that, contrary to common belief, their performance doesn’t improve in the last, most important part of the game.”
Dan Ariely, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home

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