Miracle of the Rose Quotes

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Miracle of the Rose Miracle of the Rose by Jean Genet
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Miracle of the Rose Quotes (showing 1-14 of 14)
“When I got to the street, I walked boldly. But I was always accompanied by an agonizing thought: the fear that honest people may be thieves who have chosen a cleverer and safer way of stealing.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“...beauty is the projection of ugliness and by developing certain monstrosities we obtain the purest ornaments.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“The door made the usual, terrifying sound of a door.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“Certain acts dazzle us and light up blurred surfaces, if our eyes are sharp enough to see them in a flash, for the beauty of a living thing can be grasped only fleetingly. To pursue it during its changes leads us inevitably to the moment when it ceases, for it cannot last a lifetime. And to analyze it, that is, to pursue it in time with the sight and the imagination, is to view it in its decline, for following the marvelous moment in which it reveals itself, it diminishes in intensity.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“He did not joke, as the newspapers dared report, for sarcasm is bitter and conceals ferments of despair.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“When I wrote to him, I wanted my letters to be sprightly, trivial, indifferent. In spite of myself, I imbued them with my love. I would have liked to make it seem powerful, sure of itself and sure of me, but I infused it, despite myself, with all my anxiety.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“He already had one foot in the winter of heaven. He was going to be whisked up.”
Jean Genet, Miracle de la rose
“But I shall transmit their names far down the ages. These names alone will remain in the future, divested of their objects. Who, it will be asked, were Bulkaen, Harcamone, Divers, who was Pilorge, who was Guy? And their names will inspire awe, as we are awed by the light from a star that has been dead a thousand years. Have I told all there was to tell of this adventure? If I take leave of this book, I take leave of what can be related. The rest is ineffable. I say no more and walk barefoot.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“If I have viewed them from a certain angle, it is because, seen from there, that is how they looked--which may be due to prismatic distortion, but which is therefore what they also are, though unaware of being it.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“I was in the habit of calling a kiss a peck. Bulkaen had said “a smack.” As erotic language, such as we use in dalliance, is a kind of secretion, a concentrated juice that flows from the lips only in moments of the most intense emotion, of plaint, as this language is, in other words, the essential expression of passion, each pair of lovers has its own peculiar language, a language which has a perfume, an odor sui generis which belongs only to that couple… intimacy… the secret rites of a deep love.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“Then, upon turning their heads,they realised that they had unwittingly been following a succession of winding paths more complicated than those of a mine. There was no end to Harcamone's interior. It was more decked with black than capital whose king has just been assassinated. A voice from the heart declared: "The interior is grieving," and they swelled with fear, which rose within them like a light wind above the sea.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“A few words which he wanted to emphasize were put into brackets or set off by quotation marks. My first impulse was to point out to him that it was ridiculous to put slang words and expressions between quotation marks, for that prevents them from entering the language. But I decided not to. When I received his letters, his parentheses made me shudder. At first, it was a shudder of slight shame, disagreeable. Later (and now, when I reread them) the shudder was the same, but I know, by some indefinable, imperceptible change, that it is a shudder of love- it is both poignant and delightful, perhaps because of the memory of the word shame that accompanied it in the beginning. Those parentheses and quotation marks are the flaw on the hip, the beauty mark on the thigh whereby my friend showed that he was himself, irreplaceable, and that he was wounded.”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“Hell has degrees, so does love”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose
“For I do not love the oppressed. I love those whom I love, who are always handsome and sometimes oppressed but stand up and rebel”
Jean Genet, Miracle of the Rose

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