Gunn's Golden Rules Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work by Tim Gunn
4,783 ratings, 3.73 average rating, 762 reviews
Open Preview
Gunn's Golden Rules Quotes (showing 1-29 of 29)
“I have heard women complain about men holding doors for them,, as if it is inherently offensive and implies that they are weak. ... I would hold a door for anyone. ... It has to do with noticing our fellow human beings and saying, "I recognize that you're on this planet, and I don't want a door hitting you in the face.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I believe that treating other people well is a lost art.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“You can be too rich and too thin, but you can never be too well read or too curious about the world.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Just the way it never rains when you have an umbrella, you'll never run into people if you look fantastic. But go outside in pajamas, and you'll run into every ex you have.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“As long as we have Netfix, Turner Classic Movies, Amazon, YouTube, and bookstores, there is no excuse ever to lack inspiration.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Call me a schoolmarm, but few things make me angrier than people not taking good care of library materials.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I will always be there in the wings saying, 'You need to be good to people. You need to take your work seriously. You need to have integrity. You need to work with what you've got.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I am a stickler for good manners, and I believe that treating other people well is a lost art. In the workplace, at the dinner table, and walking down the street--we are confronted with choices on how to treat people nearly every waking moment. Over time these choices define who we are and whether we have a lot of friends and allies or none.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I'm not sure what the moral is here...I really just wanted to tell that story.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I would certainly rather the industry not go broke, but if that's what it takes for everyone to acquire some values and lose that sense of entitlement, maybe a little belt-tightening wouldn't be so tragic.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“You know people like this, right? People who are incapable of enjoying anything.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“If someone doesn't ask, you don't have a moral obligation to say every thought that pops in your head.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I can't imagine a more aesthetically offensive item of footwear than Crocs. That little strap! I shudder.

...I know Crocs are affordable. Well, so are Converse and lots of other brands that don't look like hooves.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“To cheer myself up, I try to remember the difference between short-term and long-term success. Living a good life and making a real mark on society is a marathon, not a sprint.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“...Now we get to the Karma thing: You make yourself so vulnerable by not tipping well or treating people in the service industry with respect. Not only is it wrong to treat another human being like that, but there's a practical consideration: They're standing between you and eating. Without waiters, nothing comes to your table and nothing goes away. Aren't you worried that they'll put rat poison in your food, or at least spit in it? pages 86-87”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Would I be more comfortable in a business meeting wearing my pajamas?

No! It would feel, honestly, very weird. I would think, Where's my IV? When do I take my next meds?”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I also have no problem if you want to find a cave and have someone roll a boulder in front of it.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I try to phrase criticism in the nicest possible way, but I also never lie. If people ask, I assume it's because they want to know. People are not dumb about these things; they can tell when a compliment isn't sincere.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Doing as many makeovers as I do, I’ve learned a few things about what makes women feel better about themselves. The starting point is usually getting a new haircut. I don’t want to generalize, because every case is different, but I think it’s best to err on the side of styling your hair shorter the older you get. In my opinion, it’s generally not a good look for women over thirty to have hair way below their shoulders.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I don’t particularly like entertaining. I know I should, but I just don’t.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I don’t believe in texting while dining, sending one-word e-mails in lieu of formal thank-you cards, wearing shorts to the theater, or settling for any of the modern trends that favor comfort over politeness, ease over style. Manners are simply about asking yourself, What’s the right thing to do?”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I love cooking. I cook for myself every day. I like the ceremony of it. It takes me into a different zone. I make a lot of pasta. But cooking for a crowd of five or ten or, heaven forbid, twenty? No, thank you. I don’t like feeling like a slave to the care and feeding of my guests.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Honestly—and maybe some of you can relate to this—I just can’t stand the pressure of being responsible for hosting a memorable (and not in a bad way) evening. Martha Stewart, bless her heart, intimidates me. That level of entertaining is so over my head: What do you mean, you didn’t dig up your own potatoes for this dish? You didn’t make the doilies? The plates didn’t just come out of a kiln? I love Martha, but it gets ridiculous.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Entertaining shouldn’t be about showing off. It’s all about making people feel comfortable and setting a stage for everyone to have a good time, make new friends, and have stimulating conversations. You want to leave a party thinking: If I hadn’t gone to that, I never would have met this wonderful person, or had that delicious meal, or felt that sense of camaraderie with the people I met at the dessert table. You don’t want anyone looking at the clock, thinking, When can I leave?”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“To be a good houseguest, you should be as independent as possible. You should buy groceries or take your hosts out for dinner. Pick up after yourself. Pretend to have a good time even if you’re not. Say, ‘I’d like to make a dinner reservation tonight. What’s your favorite restaurant?’ Try not to break anything. Be quiet.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
tags: guests
“When someone dies, it’s good to mail a note. Don’t send an e-mail. You have to send a card. Everyone should have cards and stamps kicking around. I have some very simple stationery, just nice card stock with my name at the top. When the news is happy, e-mail is fine. You can e-mail congratulations about babies, weddings, anything. But when it’s not? If it’s a death or other bad news, you have to be more formal.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“People use texting and e-mail for everything, but it’s not appropriate for somber situations. If you win an Oscar, tweet away, but if you’re talking about a death or an illness, you need to use more formal channels. For example: You can promote an employee via e-mail, but you can’t fire him. You can ask someone out by e-mail, but you can’t break up with her. Happy occasions can be casual. Sad or serious ones require a personal touch.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“I’ll give you some life advice,” I said. “The first piece is: Listen and listen intently when you’re being spoken to about something. The second: Take the high road. When presented with frustration or anger or discontentment with a situation or a person, don’t reduce yourself to that level. Don’t get into a conflict in that moment. You’ll feel better about yourself for it.” Well, to my surprise, this created a near frenzy in the room. The students were aghast. I was surprised by the reaction, so I said: “Tell me more about why that seems like bad advice to you.” “I believe I should stand up for myself!” said one student. “I’m not saying you shouldn’t stand up for yourself,” I said. “I’m just saying, in the heat of the moment, walk away from it.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work
“Taking the high road is always the best way to go. You feel better about yourself, and the world feels better about you.”
Tim Gunn, Gunn's Golden Rules: Life's Little Lessons for Making It Work