Zen in the Art of Archery Quotes

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Zen in the Art of Archery Zen in the Art of Archery by Eugen Herrigel
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Zen in the Art of Archery Quotes Showing 1-30 of 30
“Don't think of what you have to do, don't consider how to carry it out!" he exclaimed. "The shot will only go smoothly when it takes the archer himself by surprise.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“What stands in your way is that you have a much too willful will. You think that what you do not do yourself does not happen.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“You worry yourself unnecessarily. Put the thought of hitting right out of your mind!”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: zen
“...being able to wait without purpose in the state of highest tension...without continually asking yourself: Shall I be able to manage it? Wait patiently, as see what comes - and how it comes!”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: zen
“The more one concentrates on breathing, the more the external stimuli fade into the background... In due course one even grows immune to larger stimuli, and at the same time detachment from them becomes easier and quicker. Care has only to be taken that the body is relaxed whether standing, sitting or lying, and if one then concentrates on breathing one soon feels oneself shut in by impermeable layers of silence. One only knows and feels that one breathes. And, to detach oneself from this feeling and knowing, no fresh decision is required, for the breathing slows down of its own accord, becomes more and more economical in the use of breath, and finally, slipping by degrees into a blurred monotone, escapes one's attention altogether.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“The right shot at the right moment does not come because you do not let go of yourself. You do not wait for fulfillment, but brace yourself for failure.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“You must learn to wait properly... By letting go of yourself, leaving yourself and everything yours behind you so decisively that nothing more is left of you but a purposeless tension”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“This exquisite state of unconcerned immersion in oneself is not, unfortunately, of long duration. It is liable to be disturbed from inside. As though sprung from nowhere, moods, feelings, desires, worries and even thoughts incontinently rise up, in a meaningless jumble.... The only successful way of rendering this disturbance inoperative is to keep on breathing quietly and unconcernedly, to enter into friendly relations with whatever appears on the scene, to accustom oneself to it, to look at it equably and at last grow weary of looking.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“And what impels him to repeat this process at every single lesson, and, with the same remorseless insistence, to make his pupils copy it without the least alteration? He sticks to this traditional custom because he knows from experience that the preparations for working put him simultaneously in the right frame of mind for creating. The meditative repose in which he performs them gives him that vital loosening and equability of all his powers, that collectedness and presence of mind, without which no right work can be done.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: focus, work, zen
“The shot will only go smoothly when it takes the archer himself by surprise.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“... the Master's warning that we should not practice anything except self-detaching immersion.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: zen
“The more one concentrates on breathing, the more the external stimuli fade into the background.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“How far the pupil will go is not the concern of the teacher and Master. Hardly has he shown him the right way when he must let him go on alone.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“I learned to lose myself so effortlessly in the breathing that I sometimes had the feeling that I myself was not breathing but—strange as this may sound—being breathed.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“The instructor’s business is not to show the way itself, but to enable the pupil to get the feel of this way to the goal by adapting it to his individual peculiarities”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“archery is still a matter of life and death to the extent that it is a contest of the archer with himself;”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“You had to suffer shipwreck through your own efforts before you were ready to seize the lifebelt he threw you. Believe me, I know from my own experience that the Master knows you and each of his pupils much better than we know ourselves. He reads in the souls of his pupils more than they care to admit.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“...the preparations for working put him simultaneously in the right frame of mind for creating... that collectedness and presence of mind...the right frame of mind for the artist is only reached when the preparing and the creating, the technical and the artistic, the material and the spiritual, the project and the object, flow together without a break.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“I must only warn you of one thing. You have become a different person in the course of these years. For this is what the art of archery means: a profound and far−reaching contest of the archer with himself. Perhaps you have hardly noticed it yet, but you will feel it very strongly when you meet your friends and acquaintances again in your own country: things will no longer harmonize as before. You will see with other eyes and measure with other measures. It has happened to me too, and it happens to all who are touched by the spirit of this art.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“He who has a hundred miles to walk should reckon ninety as half the journey,” he replied, quoting the proverb.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“Put the thought of hitting right out of your mind! You can be a Master even if every shot does not hit. The hits on the target is only an outward proof and confirmation of your purposelessness at its highest, of your egolessness, your self-abandonment, or whatever you like to call this state. There are different grades of mastery, and only when you have made the last grade will you be sure of not missing the goal.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“So understood, the art of archery is rather like a preparatory school for Zen, for it enables the beginner to gain a clearer view, through the works of his own hands, of events which are not in themselves intelligible.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“That’s just the trouble, you make an effort to think about it. Concentrate entirely on your breathing, as if you had nothing else to do!” It took me a considerable time before I succeeded in doing what the Master wanted. But—I succeeded.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“純粹以意識的觀點來看,就是我們的意識幾乎永遠被困在自我的投射之中,如果不是對於未來的憧憬或擔憂,就是對於過去的緬懷或悔恨,而無法真正忘我地活在當下。「當下真心」的狀態,如果勉強地加以描述,可以說是不帶絲毫貪求,也不帶任何憎惡的平衡心境,對一切事物都平等無分別地全然接納,於是就可以從所有的煩惱痛苦中解脫。如果要引伸到日常生活中,說起來很簡單,譬如「餓了就吃,睏了就睡」,可是對於我們這些頑冥不靈的凡夫俗子而言,實在很難參透其中的真義。”
魯宓, Zen in the Art of Archery
“首先是拉弓的困境:拉弓時如果用力會發抖,但是那些弓又非常強硬,不用力怎麼拉得開?然後是放箭的困境:放箭不能出於自己的意識,有意識的放箭都會造成箭的顫動,但是無意識又怎麼放箭?最後是擊中箭靶的困境:老師一再告誡射箭時不要有射中目標的欲望,不要瞄準,那麼要如何射中箭靶?每一個困境在知性上似乎都沒有合理的解答,學生沒有其他的辦法,只有信任老師的引導,全心全意的繼續努力,逐漸放下更多的自我投射,變得無所求與無我,於是就在自己都意想不到的情況下,突然就水到渠成,體驗到了箭術中的禪心,以最自然而無痕跡的方式完成了困難的動作。事後看來,每一個困境的解決其實都是一次「當下真心」的顯現,都是一個悟。”
魯宓, Zen in the Art of Archery
“Ten, kdo má ujít 100 mil, by měl pokládat 99 mil za polovinu cesty.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: czech
“only the truly detached can understand what is meant by “detachment”,”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“It is generally admitted that Dhyana Buddhism, which was born in India and, after undergoing profound changes, reached full development in China, to be finally adopted by Japan, where it is cultivated as a living tradition to this day, has disclosed unsuspected ways of existence which it is of the utmost importance for us to understand.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
“...kdokoliv činí rychlý pokrok na začátku, má tím více potíží později.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery
tags: czech
“Tikrasis menas yra betikslis, nesąmoningas! /.../ Jums skersai kelio stoja tai, kad turite per daug klusnią valią. Manote, kad tai, ko nepadarysite, neįvyks.”
Eugen Herrigel, Zen in the Art of Archery