Midnight's Children Quotes

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Midnight's Children Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
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Midnight's Children Quotes Showing 1-30 of 229
“I am the sum total of everything that went before me, of all I have been seen done, of everything done-to-me. I am everyone everything whose being-in-the-world affected was affected by mine. I am anything that happens after I'm gone which would not have happened if I had not come.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Memory's truth, because memory has its own special kind. It selects, eliminates, alters, exaggerates, minimizes, glorifies, and vilifies also; but in the end it creates its own reality, its heterogeneous but usually coherent version of events; and no sane human being ever trusts someone else's version more than his own.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“We all owe death a life.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“To understand just one life you have to swallow the world ... do you wonder, then, that I was a heavy child?”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“What's real and what's true aren't necessarily the same.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Most of what matters in our lives takes place in our absence.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
tags: life
“‎No people whose word for 'yesterday' is the same as their word for 'tomorrow' can be said to have a firm grip on the time.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Children are the vessels into which adults pour their poison.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“What can't be cured must be endured.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Who what am I? My answer: I am everyone everything whose being-in-the-world affected was affected by mine. I am anything that happens after I’ve gone which would not have happened if I had not come. Nor am I particularly exceptional in this matter; each ‘I’, every one of the now-six-hundred-million-plus of us, contains a similar multitude. I repeat for the last time: to understand me, you’ll have to swallow the world.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“To understand just one life, you have to swallow the world.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“I learned: the first lesson of my life: nobody can face the world with his eyes open all the time.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Reality is a question of perspective; the further you get from the past, the more concrete and plausible it seems - but as you approach the present, it inevitably seems more and more incredible.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Who what am I? My answer: I am the sum total of everything that went before me, of all I have been seen done, of everything done-to-me. I am everyone everything whose being-in-the-world affected was affected by mine. I am anything that happens after I've gone which would not have happened if I had not come. Nor am I particularly exceptional in this matter; each "I", everyone of the now-six-hundred-million-plus of us, contains a similar multitude. I repeat for the last time: to understand me, you'll have to swallow a world.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“perhaps, if one wishes to remain an individual in the midst of the teeming multitudes, one must make oneself grotesque.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Whores and writers, Mahound. We are the people you can't forgive.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“I admit it: above all things, I fear absurdity.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Things, even people have a way of leaking into each other like flavours when you cook.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“For every snake, there is a ladder; for every ladder,a snake”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Unless, of course, there's no such thing as chance;...in which case, we should either-optimistically-get up and cheer, because if everything is planned in advance, then we all have a meaning and are spared the terror of knowing ourselves to be random, without a why; or else, of course, we might-as pessimists-give up right here and now, understanding the futility of thought decision action, since nothing we think makes any difference anyway, things will be as they will. Where, then, is optimism? In fate or in chaos?”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“What you were is forever who you are.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“...because silence, too, has an echo, hollower and longer-lasting than the reverberations of any sound.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“India, the new myth--a collective fiction in which anything was possible, a fable rivalled only by the two other mighty fantasies: money and God.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“There is nothing like a War for the reinvention of lives...”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“Everything has shape, if you look for it. There is no escape from form.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“optimism is a disease”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“What grows best in the heat: fantasy; unreason; lust.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
tags: heat
“For an instant, silence, noisier than a waterfall.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“What had been (at the beginning) no bigger than a full stop had expanded into a comma, a word, a sentence, a paragraph, a chapter; now it was bursting into more complex developments, becoming, one might say, a book - perhaps an encylopaedia - even a whole language...”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
“One Kashmiri morning in the early spring of 1915, my grandfather Aadam Aziz hit his nose against a frost-hardened tussock of earth while attempting to pray. Three drops of blood plopped out of his left nostril, hardened instantly in the brittle air and lay before his eyes on the prayer-mat, transformed into rubies. Lurching back until he knelt with his head once more upright, he found that the tears which had sprung to his eyes had solidified, too; and at that moment, as he brushed diamonds contemptuously from his lashes, he resolved never again to kiss earth for any god or man. This decision, however, made a hole in him, a vacancy in a vital inner chamber, leaving him vulnerable to women and history. Unaware of this at first, despite his recently completed medical training, he stood up, rolled the prayer-mat into a thick cheroot, and holding it under his right arm surveyed the valley through clear, diamond-free eyes.”
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children

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