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·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 107 of 176 of Cannery Row
The things we admire in men, kindness and generosity, openness, honesty, understanding, and feeling are the concomitants of failure in our system. And those traits we detest, sharpness, greed, acquisitiveness, meanness, egotism and self-interest are the traits of success. And while men admire the quality of the first they love the produce of the second.
Feb 13, 2015 09:27AM 1 comment
Cannery Row

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 63 of 176 of Cannery Row
"I bet Mack could of been president of the US if he wanted," he said.
"What could he do with it if he had it?" Jones asked. "There wouldn't be no fun in that."
Feb 12, 2015 05:15AM Add a comment
Cannery Row

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 96 of 434 of Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World
The trade between Europe and Asia was complicated by the fact that those in charge of purchasing in India had no clear sense of how well the products might sell in Europe, while those in charge of selling to European metropolitan markets had little understanding of how procurement worked in South Asia.
Feb 06, 2015 03:48AM Add a comment
Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 37 of 434 of Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World
Sir John Mandeville is rarely cited for the trustworthiness of the observations that he gathered during his alleged travels to Asia in the 1320s. He says in India grew a 'wonderful tree which bore tiny lambs on the endes of its branches. These branches were so pliable that they bent down to allow the lambs to feed when they are hungrie.'
Feb 05, 2015 08:09AM Add a comment
Cotton: The Fabric That Made the Modern World

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 126 of 250 of Rue des boutiques obscures
Au fond, je n'avais peut-être jamais été ce Pedro McEvoy, je n'étais rien, mais des ondes me traversaient, tantôt lointaines, tantôt plus fortes et tous ces échos épars qui flottaient dans l'air se cristallisaient et c'était moi.
Jan 23, 2015 01:31PM Add a comment
Rue des boutiques obscures

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 224 of 448 of The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America
Between the late 1970s and 2007.. the financial sector grew spectacularly and the rules and norms that had kept it in check collapsed. Financial companies doubled their share of corporate profits in America, and salaries in finance doubled as a share of national earnings. The top 1 per cent more than tripled its share of national income, while the income of those in the middle rose by only 20%, and the income of
Jan 02, 2015 03:17PM 1 comment
The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 159 of 466 of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Very correctly, Harari can find no biological reason why patriarchical societies should be such a dominant form.
Sep 28, 2014 07:52AM Add a comment
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 147 of 466 of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Culture tends to argue that it only forbids that which is unnatural. But from a biological perspectve, nothing is unnatural. Whatever is possible is by definition also natural. A truly unnatural behaviour, one that goes against the laws of nature, simply cannot exist, so it would need no prohibition. No culture ever bothered to forbid men to photosynthesise, women to run faster than the speed of light...
Sep 28, 2014 07:40AM Add a comment
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 72 of 466 of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Homo Sapiens drove to extinction about half of the planet's big beasts long before humans invented the wheel, writing, or iron tools. The 1st Wave Extinction was followed by the 2nd Wave Extinction, which accompanied the spread of the farmers..Don't believe tree huggers who claim that our ancestors lived in harmony with nature..We have the dubious distinction of being the deadliest species in the annals of biology.
Sep 24, 2014 12:15PM 1 comment
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 31 of 466 of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
Telling effective stories is not easy. The difficulty lies not in telling the story, but in convincing everyone else to believe it. Much of history revolves around this question: how does one convince millions of people to believe particular stories about gods, or nations, or limited liability companies? Yet when it succeeds, it gives Sapiens immense power, because it enables millions of strangers ......
Sep 24, 2014 04:14AM 2 comments
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 656 of 848 of The Luminaries
Oh look. only 600 pages in, and it is beginning to pick up a bit of impetus.
Sep 19, 2014 01:48PM 2 comments
The Luminaries

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 360 of 848 of The Luminaries
Part One alone is longer than a lot of novels that say more in half the words. And James Wood thinks that David Mitchell has plenty to tell but not much to say. What would he make of Ms Catton? *Goes away to hunt out a review*
Sep 15, 2014 12:28PM 5 comments
The Luminaries

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 213 of 848 of The Luminaries
I wonder if this is going to be more than a very big, fat, complex, competent, historical detective story.
Sep 14, 2014 02:30AM Add a comment
The Luminaries

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 303 of 595 of The Bone Clocks
"Miguel tries to look jokey-penitent, but misses and looks like a man in white jeans who underestimates a spot of flatulence."
Sep 10, 2014 10:44AM Add a comment
The Bone Clocks

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 286 of 595 of The Bone Clocks
The writer, Hershey, at a book signing: "My last punter, a Volumnia from Coventry, treated me to her book group's thoughts on Red Monkey, which they 'quite liked' but found the repitition of the adjectives 'sodding' and 'buggering' tiresome. Dear reader, Hershey missed not a beat: 'So why choose the buggering book in the frist sodding place?'"
Sep 10, 2014 09:38AM 2 comments
The Bone Clocks

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 202 of 595 of The Bone Clocks
"You wouldn't catch respectable ladies like us going anywhere near a Scrabble board."
Sep 09, 2014 01:54PM Add a comment
The Bone Clocks

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 202 of 595 of The Bone Clocks
There is some weird shit here, but it's a wild ride and I can't get off.
Sep 09, 2014 01:16PM 4 comments
The Bone Clocks

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 154 of 267 of The Conservationist
A Sunday gathering beside the swimmimg pool: "...while the hoarse yelling exhortation of rock records provides exciting castigation from another generation, as if some mad prophet were being allowed to carry on raving somewhere in the beautiful garden." Magnificent.
Sep 06, 2014 11:52AM Add a comment
The Conservationist

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 263 of 555 of In the Light of What We Know
Overambitious projects may be objectionable in many fields, but not in literature. Literature remains alive only if we set ourselves immeasurable goals, far beyond all hope of achievement. Only if poets and writers set themselves tasks that no-one else dares imagine will literature continue to have a function... (Italo Calvino, 'Multiplicity', translated by Patrick Creagh)
Aug 26, 2014 07:34AM 1 comment
In the Light of What We Know

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 97 of 555 of In the Light of What We Know
"We think we have the measure of so many people, we have the sense of what they're about, what drives them in the world. How many do we think of in this way? We might count them. But when we begin to think of how many people we believe in turn have the measure of us, things fall apart."
Aug 24, 2014 01:09AM Add a comment
In the Light of What We Know

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 89 of 555 of In the Light of What We Know
The house of delusions is cheap to build, but drafty to live in, and ready at any instant to fall; it is surely truer prudence to move our furniture betimes into the open air than to stay indoors until our tenement tumbles about our ears. It is and it must in the long run be better for a man to see things as they are than to be ignorant of them. A.E. Housman.
Aug 24, 2014 01:04AM Add a comment
In the Light of What We Know

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 26 of 555 of In the Light of What We Know
".... a copy of Dante's Inferno, which Emily had sent to me when I was in hospital. I was once the patient of a psychiatric hospital." Now, there are plenty of books I might be tempted to send someone in psychiatric care, but I don't believe Dante's Inferno would be high on the list.
Aug 22, 2014 09:16AM 2 comments
In the Light of What We Know

·Karen·
·Karen· is on page 25 of 555 of In the Light of What We Know
"Every time we want to understand anything, we have to simplify and reduce and, importantly, give up the idea of understanding it all, in order to clear the way to understanding something at all. This, I think, is true of all human enquiry."
Aug 22, 2014 09:00AM Add a comment
In the Light of What We Know

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