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The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930 The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930
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Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 181 of 240
(2/2) And the book ends with the section on LANGSTON HUGHES. Pages 174-181.
The day ended at a crematory as a dwindling group of his closest friends joined hands. As Hughes's body was wheeled toward the flames, they recited in unison the legendary poem of his early ears, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers.” Page 181 has just the poem.
Feb 29, 2020 02:24PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 181 of 240
(1/2) And the book ends with the section on LANGSTON HUGHES. Pages 174-181. “His funeral, a celebration of the poet, featured a service of blues, jazz, poems, and reminiscences, concluding with Duke Ellington's "Do Nothing Until You Hear from Me."
Feb 29, 2020 02:23PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 172 of 240
Great final section on ZORA NEALE HURSTON pgs 169-172
Feb 29, 2020 01:52PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 163 of 240
The Death of A’LELIA WALKER.
Feb 29, 2020 11:25AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 160 of 240
HURSTON AND HUGHES AND MASON AND LOCKE: THE BREAKUP.
Feb 29, 2020 10:24AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 158 of 240
Prejudice grew as jobs diminished—after the Crash, unemployment in Harlem was five times that of the rest of the city. Ugly incidents such as the one in Alabama, sentencing to death the Scottsboro Boys (nine black youths aged thirteen to nineteen) on trumped-up charges of raping two white prostitutes, spotlit America's still-prevailing forces of bigotry. (2/2)
Feb 29, 2020 09:51AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 158 of 240
Blacks from around the world migrated to one of the most densely crowded regions of the world. (1/2)
Feb 29, 2020 09:51AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 157 of 240
After The Renaissance (3/3)
The Crash ushered in a period in which white patrons attended to more immediately pressing financial matters than their support of Negro writers. "We were no longer in vogue, anyway, we Negroes," recalled Langston Hughes. "Sophisticated New Yorkers turned to Noel Coward. "
Feb 29, 2020 09:39AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 157 of 240
After The Renaissance (2/3)
Even Carl Van Vechten forswore drinking and smoking, and within a few years his wife would declare the Harlem experience "a phase in the life of this generation. It was all very hollow."
Feb 29, 2020 09:38AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 157 of 240
After The Renaissance (1/3)

THE END: 1929 AND AFTER. The Wall Street Crash of October 29, 1929, marked the close of an epoch: the era of the Charleston and speakeasies, black wunderkinds and James J. Walker, was replaced by insecurity and breadlines, overcrowding and the Scottsboro Boys.
Feb 29, 2020 09:38AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 157 of 240
Last Chapter: AFTER THE RENAISSANCE. Finally.
Feb 29, 2020 09:32AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 152 of 240
"The trouble with white folks singing blues...is that they can't get low down enough." BESSIE SMITH
Feb 25, 2020 02:01PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 152 of 240
This page starts a “Flashback: Zora and Langston’s Southern Idylll”
Feb 25, 2020 01:51PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 148 of 240
The relationship between “ZORA AND GODMOTHER” (ZORA NEALE HURSTON and CHARLOTTE MASON) was wild, but led to Hurston’s artistic depth and freedom.
Feb 25, 2020 01:39PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 144 of 240
“Godmother’s Court” starts the section on white patron of the Renaissance CHARLOTTE VAN DER VEER QUICK MASON aka CHARLOTTE MASON aka “Godmother”.
Feb 25, 2020 01:26PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 140 of 240
This is where the book starts talking about the “Harlem Hostess” A’LELIA WALKER.
Feb 25, 2020 01:06PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 139 of 240
This page they talk about the various dances back then.
Feb 25, 2020 01:01PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 138 of 240
Starting with the SAVOY BALLROOM
Feb 25, 2020 12:59PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 130 of 240
Re: RENT PARTIES “These events, which were Harlemized versions of the JOOK-JOINT parties of the Deep South, reminded many recent immigrants of their roots.”
Feb 23, 2020 03:32PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 130 of 240
This is the page that starts the section on RENT PARTIES.
Feb 23, 2020 01:50PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 129 of 240
The decibel level went up after 3:00 A.M., when New York's curfew law shuttered the city's legitimate cabarets. At this point, moonlighting performers dropped into the clubs that had paid off the police for "special charters.
Feb 23, 2020 01:47PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 128 of 240
Working-Class Speakeasies
Feb 23, 2020 01:36PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 128 of 240
THE COTTON CLUB (3/3)
"It isn't necessary to mix with colored people if you don't feel like it," JIMMY DURANTE comforted the squeamish. The Cotton Club allowed the timid and well-heeled to cautiously dip their stylishly shod feet into the roiling waters of prime itive Uptown.
Feb 16, 2020 12:29PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 128 of 240
THE COTTON CLUB (2/3)
Black performers did not mix with the club's clientele, and after the show many of them went next door to the basement of the superintendent at 646 Lenox, where they imbibed corn whiskey, peach brandy, and marijuana.
Feb 16, 2020 12:29PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 128 of 240
THE COTTON CLUB (1/2) The division between the performers and the audience was more carefully maintained than in any other club in Harlem. (Even its name evoked both the antebellum South and the color of its patrons.) The club was owned by white mobsters, its shows written and directed by whites from Broadway and performed for an all-white audience.
Feb 16, 2020 12:27PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 126 of 240
Did not know this “Getting the jump on the Uptown craze, mobster OWNEY MADDEN opened THE COTTON CLUB in the fall of 1923 as the East Coast outlet for his bootleg beer.
Feb 16, 2020 12:19PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 126 of 240
THE COTTON CLUB was not the only Harlem club catered to white audiences, but it was the largest, featured the most extravagant shows, charged the highest prices, and most strictly enforced the color line. No less than England's Lady Mountbatten dubbed it "the Aristocrat of Harlem.
Feb 16, 2020 12:12PM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 125 of 240
The uncontested Big Three (White Oriented Trade Clubs of Harlem) were THE COTTON CLUB, CONNIE’S INN and SMALL’S PARADISE.
Feb 16, 2020 11:40AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 124 of 240
In the section “HARLEM AFTER DARK: A TOUR”

"Harlem is the one place that is gay and delightful however dull and depressing the downtown regions may be," novelist MAX EWING wrote his mother. "Nothing affects the vitality and the freshness of Harlem.”
Feb 16, 2020 11:07AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

Dankwa Brooks
Dankwa Brooks is on page 110 of 240
This page starts highlighting the music artists of the Harlem Renaissance starting with the legend JOSEPHINE BAKER.
Feb 16, 2020 11:02AM Add a comment
The Harlem Renaissance: Hub of African-American Culture, 1920-1930

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