Martin

Add friend
Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Martin.


Martin’s Recent Updates

Martin rated a book liked it
The Fifth Elephant by Terry Pratchett
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin rated a book really liked it
Thud! by Terry Pratchett
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin rated a book it was ok
Hidden by Benedict Jacka
Hidden (Alex Verus, #5)
by Benedict Jacka (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Atlantic by Simon Winchester
"As a fan of historical nautical books like Seawolves and Barrow's Boys, and of Golding's Ends of the Earth series, I started this book figuratively rubbing my hands in anticipation of some great sea stories and novel science facts to quote to peop..." Read more of this review »
Atlantic by Simon Winchester
"Oh, dear, Simon Winchester, I think you have to stop being my literary boyfriend now. Someone get this man an editor, quickly. I've never skipped over so many pages of a book before.

It's not that he hasn't dug up fascinating facts and interesting..." Read more of this review »
Martin rated a book really liked it
The Game by Ken Dryden
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin rated a book really liked it
Usagi Yojimbo, Vol. 12 by Stan Sakai
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin rated a book it was amazing
Usagi Yojimbo, Vol. 3 by Stan Sakai
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin rated a book really liked it
Usagi Yojimbo, Vol. 4 by Stan Sakai
Rate this book
Clear rating
Martin has read
Usagi Yojimbo, Vol. 3 by Stan Sakai
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Martin's books…
James Madison
“We maintain therefore that in matters of Religion, no man’s right is abridged by the institution of Civil Society, and that Religion is wholly exempt from its cognizance. True it is, that no other rule exists, by which any question which may divide a Society, can be ultimately determined, but the will of the majority; but it is also true, that the majority may trespass on the rights of the minority.

...Because it is proper to take alarm at the first experiment on our liberties. We hold this prudent jealousy to be the first duty of Citizens, and one of the noblest characteristics of the late Revolution. The free men of America did not wait till usurped power had strengthened itself by exercise, and entangled the question in precedents. They saw all the consequences in the principle, and they avoided the consequences by denying the principle. We revere this lesson too much soon to forget it. Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? that the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?

...Because experience witnesseth that ecclesiastical establishments, instead of maintaining the purity and efficacy of Religion, have had a contrary operation. During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What have been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the Clergy, ignorance and servility in the laity, in both, superstition, bigotry and persecution.

...What influence in fact have ecclesiastical establishments had on Civil Society? In some instances they have been seen to erect a spiritual tyranny on the ruins of the Civil authority; in many instances they have been seen upholding the thrones of political tyranny: in no instance have they been seen the guardians of the liberties of the people. Rulers who wished to subvert the public liberty, may have found an established Clergy convenient auxiliaries. A just Government instituted to secure & perpetuate it needs them not. Such a Government will be best supported by protecting every Citizen in the enjoyment of his Religion with the same equal hand which protects his person and his property; by neither invading the equal rights of any Sect, nor suffering any Sect to invade those of another.

[Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, 20 June 1785. This was written in response to a proposed bill that would establish 'teachers of the Christian religion', violating the 1st Amendment's establishment clause]”
James Madison, A Memorial and Remonstrance, on the Religious Rights of Man: Written in 1784-85

W. Somerset Maugham
“The fact that a great many people believe something is no guarantee of its truth.”
W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor's Edge

Neil Gaiman
“I don’t ever remember being afraid of “oldness”.

There are things I miss about being younger - chiefly the ability to pull all-nighters and keep working and working well; and being smiled at by girls I didn’t know who thought I was cute; and I wish I had the eyesight I had even five years ago… but that stuff feels pretty trivial.

I’m happier than I’ve been at any time in my life these days. I have a wonderful wife whom I adore, watched three amazing kids grow into two delightful adults and my favourite teenager, an astonishing number of grand life experiences, I’ve made art I’m proud of, I have real, true, glorious friends, and I’ve been able to do real good for things I care about, like freedom of speech, like libraries.

Sometimes I’ll do something like An Evening With Neil and Amanda, or the 8 in 8 project, and completely surprise myself.

I miss friends who have died, but then, I’m glad that time gave them to me, to befriend, even for a while, and that I was alive to know them. I knew Douglas Adams, and I knew Roger Zelazny, and I knew John M Ford, and I knew Diana Wynne Jones… do you know how lucky that makes me?

Ah, I’m rabbiting on, and I sound a bit more Pollyannaish than I’m intending to sound: I know the downside of age and the downside of time, and I am sure that the view from age 51 is not the view from age 71.

I wish the time hadn’t gone so fast, though. And sometimes I wish I’d enjoyed it more on the way, and worried about it less.”
Neil Gaiman

Jim Butcher
“Son. Everyone dies alone. That's what it is. It's a door. It's one person wide. When you go through it, you do it alone. But it doesn't mean you've got to be alone before you go through the door. And believe me, you aren't alone on the other side.”
Jim Butcher, Dead Beat

See your year in books badge
Brandie
1,306 books | 39 friends

Jasper ...
1 book | 21 friends

Jennife...
4 books | 31 friends

Joyce E...
259 books | 15 friends

Lisa Ko...
0 books | 21 friends

Theresa...
15 books | 26 friends

Laura
0 books | 17 friends

Megan C...
30 books | 15 friends

More friends…



Polls voted on by Martin

Lists liked by Martin