Kevin Eagan

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The Tempest
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Essentialism: The...
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Oblivion
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The Self-Driven Child by William Stixrud
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The Tempest by William Shakespeare
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Essentialism by Greg McKeown
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Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff
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Kevin Eagan made a comment on his status in On Bullshit
On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
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Oblivion by David Foster Wallace
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On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt
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So Good They Can't Ignore You by Cal Newport
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The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
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So Good They Can't Ignore You by Cal Newport
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More of Kevin's books…
Anne Lamott
“Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life, and it is the main obstacle between you and a shitty first draft. I think perfectionism is based on the obsessive belief that if you run carefully enough, hitting each stepping-stone just right, you won't have to die. The truth is that you will die anyway and that a lot of people who aren't even looking at their feet are going to do a whole lot better than you, and have a lot more fun while they're doing it.”
Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

Elizabeth Warren
“There is nobody in this country who got rich on their own. Nobody. You built a factory out there - good for you. But I want to be clear. You moved your goods to market on roads the rest of us paid for. You hired workers the rest of us paid to educate. You were safe in your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. You didn't have to worry that marauding bands would come and seize everything at your factory... Now look. You built a factory and it turned into something terrific or a great idea - God bless! Keep a hunk of it. But part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along.”
Elizabeth Warren

Scott Stossel
“More than a few people, some of whom think they know me quite well, have remarked that they are struck that I, who can seem so even-keeled and imperturbable, would choose to write a book about anxiety. I smile gently while churning inside and thinking about what I’ve learned is a signature characteristic of the phobic personality: “the need and ability”—as described in the self-help book Your Phobia—“to present a relatively placid, untroubled appearance to others, while suffering extreme distress on the inside.”c”
Scott Stossel, My Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind

“Nearly a half-century after his death, “paranoid style” is an established part of the political lexicon, employed often by those who want to suggest that the other side is fringe or paranoid or just plain daft. One wonders if Hofstadter would approve. Americans are warier of government than ever, and filled to the brim with conspiracy theories. And they are still shouting.”
Anonymous

Anne Lamott
“Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It's like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can't stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.”
Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

74586 Afterwords Books — 86 members — last activity Jan 08, 2016 12:46PM
Afterwords hosts a monthly book club and a monthly documentary club. Both are discussed here as well at the in person meetings. If you can't attend fe ...more
100106 The Kindle Chronicles — 364 members — last activity Oct 29, 2017 12:26PM
For listeners of The Kindle Chronicles weekly audio podcast.
2802 Amazon Kindle — 7869 members — last activity 7 hours, 1 min ago
For readers using the Amazon Kindle ebook device.
76002 The Verge Book Club — 943 members — last activity Nov 03, 2014 05:51PM
The Verge Book Club: A discussion forum for members of The Verge Book Club. You can subscribe to our podcast in iTunes here. Also here: http://www.the ...more
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