AndyDobbieArt

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Picasso and Moder...
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Ten to Zen: Ten M...
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Art in Theory 190...
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AndyDobbieArt wants to read
Art And Society by Herbert Read
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Picasso and Modern British Art by James Beechy
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Ten to Zen by Owen O'Kane
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Paul Nash Masterpieces of Art by Michael Kerrigan
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Picasso and the Art of Drawing by Christopher Lloyd
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AndyDobbieArt wants to read 12 books in the 2020 Reading Challenge
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He has read 2 books toward his goal of 12 books.
 
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AndyDobbieArt is currently reading
Picasso and the Art of Drawing by Christopher Lloyd
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Modernists and Mavericks by Martin Gayford
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A hugely enjoyable book. I've read it twice in quick succession and will probably reread it again soon to squeeze all the nuggets out of it.
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David Hockney by Marco Livingstone
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A fascinating insight into the ups and downs and ins and outs of Hockney's thought processes and their effect on his art. I look forward to reading it again and taking notes.
AndyDobbieArt rated a book it was amazing
Modernists and Mavericks by Martin Gayford
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A hugely enjoyable book. I've read it twice in quick succession and will probably reread it again soon to squeeze all the nuggets out of it.
More of AndyDobbieArt's books…
Ira Glass
“Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.”
Ira Glass

Adam Smith
“The great source of both the misery and disorders of human life, seems to arise from over-rating the difference between one permanent situation and another. Avarice over-rates the difference between poverty and riches: ambition, that between a private and a public station: vain-glory, that between obscurity and extensive reputation. The person under the influence of any of those extravagant passions, is not only miserable in his actual situation, but is often disposed to disturb the peace of society, in order to arrive at that which he so foolishly admires. The slightest observation, however, might satisfy him, that, in all the ordinary situations of human life, a well-disposed mind may be equally calm, equally cheerful, and equally contented. Some of those situations may, no doubt, deserve to be preferred to others: but none of them can deserve to be pursued with that passionate ardour which drives us to violate the rules either of prudence or of justice; or to corrupt the future tranquillity of our minds, either by shame from the remembrance of our own folly, or by remorse from the horror of our own injustice.”
Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments