Karina van Schaardenburg

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Brian Brian wants to read The Armourer's House
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Jane of Lantern Hill by L.M. Montgomery
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Winner-Take-All Politics by Jacob S. Hacker
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American Amnesia by Jacob S. Hacker
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The Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle
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Kochland by Christopher Leonard
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Permanent Record by Edward Snowden
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The Triumph of Injustice by Emmanuel Saez
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The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
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A River in Darkness by Masaji Ishikawa
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More of Karina's books…
Steve Krug
“Your guess [about the future of technology] is as good as mine. The only thing I'm sure of is (a) most of the predictions I hear are almost certainly wrong, and (b) the things that will turn out to be important will come as a surprise, even though in hindsight they'll seem perfectly obvious.”
Steve Krug

Henry S.F. Cooper Jr.
“As additional precautions, Kranz requested that a two-hundred-foot radio antenna (called a deep-space dish) in Australia be added to the global network tracking and communicating with the spacecraft, and that additional computers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland be what he called "cranked up" -- made ready for use. He also telephoned the Real Time Computer Complex on the ground floor of the Operations Wing to ask that an additional I.B.M. computer be brought onto the line.”
Henry S.F. Cooper Jr., XIII: The Apollo Flight That Failed

John Green
“I believe the universe wants to be noticed. I think the universe is inprobably biased toward the consciousness, that it rewards intelligence in part because the universe enjoys its elegance being observed. And who am I, living in the middle of history, to tell the universe that it-or my observation of it-is temporary?”
John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Carl Sagan
“Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.”
Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

Kurt Vonnegut
“Plato says that the unexamined life is not worth living. But what if the examined life turns out to be a clunker as well?”
Kurt Vonnegut, Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons

240530 Other Minds Book Club — 5 members — last activity Sep 13, 2017 08:50PM
An online book club about philosophy, animals, planets, plants, deep space, deep thoughts, and the science behind gesticulations,
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