Mario Sundar

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Becoming
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The Laws of Human...
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by Robert Greene (Goodreads Author)
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Atomic Habits: An...
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Book cover for The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers
No matter who you are, you need two kinds of friends in your life. The first kind is one you can call when something good happens, and you need someone who will be excited for you. Not a fake excitement veiling envy, but a real excitement. ...more
@bhorowitz drops some serious wisdom in his new book, not unlike @The_RobertEvans. Page turner.
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Becoming by Michelle Obama
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The Laws of Human Nature by Robert Greene
The Laws of Human Nature
by Robert Greene (Goodreads Author)
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Atomic Habits by James Clear
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Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami
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Bad Blood by John Carreyrou
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The Bhagavad Gita by Barbara Stoler Miller
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Fear by Bob Woodward
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Self-Compassion by Kristin Neff
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Creative Selection by Ken Kocienda
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Small Fry by Lisa Brennan-Jobs
Small Fry
by Lisa Brennan-Jobs (Goodreads Author)
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Ed Catmull
“There is another, different meaning of reality distortion for me. It stems from my belief that our decisions and actions have consequences and that those consequences shape our future. Our actions change our reality. Our intentions matter. Most people believe that their actions have consequences but don’t think through the implications of that belief. But Steve did. He believed, as I do, that it is precisely by acting on our intentions and staying true to our values that we change the world.”
Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Jean-Paul Sartre
“We stay silent for a moment. Evening is coming on; I can hardly make out the pale spot of her face. Her black dress melts with the shadow which floods the room. I pick up my cup mechanically, there’s a little tea left in it and I bring it to my lips. The tea is cold. I want to smoke but I don’t dare. I have the terrible feeling that we have nothing more to say to one another.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Ed Catmull
“I could see something that Bill couldn’t: Steve had responded to Bill’s passion about the issue. The fact that Bill was willing to stand up so forcefully and articulately for what he believed showed Steve that Bill’s ideas were worthy of respect. Steve never raised the format issue with us again.”
Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration

Brent Schlender
“As I pored over my old documents, I kept coming back to the time that many have described as his “wilderness” years, the dozen years between his first tenure at Apple and his return. That era, from 1985 to 1997, is easy to overlook.”
Brent Schlender, Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader

Brent Schlender
“The young man making a hash of his visit to the Garden of Allah that December evening was a mess of contradictions. He was a cofounder of one of the most successful startups ever, but he didn’t want to be seen as a businessman. He craved the advice of mentors, and yet resented those in power. He dropped acid, walked barefoot, wore scraggly jeans, and liked the idea of living in a commune, yet he also loved nothing more than speeding down the highway in a finely crafted German sports car. He had a vague desire to support good causes, but he hated the inefficiency of most charities. He was impatient as hell and knew that the only problems worth solving were ones that would take years to tackle. He was a practicing Buddhist and an unrepentant capitalist. He was an overbearing know-it-all berating people who were wiser and immensely more experienced, and yet he was absolutely right about their fundamental marketing naïveté. He could be aggressively rude and then truly contrite. He was intransigent, and yet eager to learn. He walked away, and he walked back in to apologize. At the Garden of Allah he displayed all the brash, ugly behavior that became an entrenched part of the Steve Jobs myth. And he showed a softer side that would go less recognized over the years. To truly understand Steve and the incredible journey he was about to undergo, the full transformation that he would experience over his rich life, you have to recognize, accept, and try to reconcile both sides of the man.”
Brent Schlender, Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader