Katya Kazbek

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Lonely Planet Los...
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The Cake Tree in ...
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Mar 12, 2019 11:32AM

 
The Invisible Valley
Katya Kazbek is currently reading
by Su Wei
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See all 16 books that Katya is reading…

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Katya Kazbek is currently reading
Lonely Planet Los Angeles, San Diego & Southern California by Lonely Planet
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The Cake Tree in the Ruins by Akiyuki Nosaka
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Real Queer America by Samantha  Allen
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The Children by Jean-Philippe Stassen
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“The condition of a native is a nervous condition…” Jean-Paul Sartre wrote in his preface to Fritz Fanon's "Wretched of the Earth". And I always think about it in my quest for various narratives of the post-colonial world: it's both important and ins ...more
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The Making of Modern China by Jing Liu
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The Invisible Valley by Su Wei
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Modern Man by Anthony Flint
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The Emperor by Ryszard Kapuściński
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The Graves Are Walking by John     Kelly
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Monster City by Michael Arntfield
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More of Katya's books…
Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“...we spend most of our time... misinterpreting others, reading them in the wrong key, trying to take a leap toward them and then falling into the abyss. There is no real way to know what goes on inside, though the illusion might be never so attractive: all the time vast spaces open between us and others, and the mirage of comprehension or empathy is just that, a mirage. We are all enclosed in our own incommunicable experience, and death is the least communicable experience of all, and after death, the most incommunicable experience is the desire to die.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, La forma de las ruinas

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“The First World War, which at that moment was not the first, since they were unaware of the possibility of a second, but the Great War. That’s what they called it: the Great War. They also called it, with populist optimism, the War to End All Wars. The name of that conflict has changed over the years, as perhaps the nature of the explanation we’ve invented to talk about it has changed. Our capacity to name things is limited, and those limits are that much more sensitive or cruel if the things we’re trying to name have disappeared forever. That’s what the past is: a tale, a tale constructed over another tale, an artifice of verbs and nouns where we might be able to capture human pain, their fear of death and eagerness to live, their homesickmness while battling in the trenches, the worry for the soldier who has gone to the fields of Flanders and who might already be dead when we remember him.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, La forma de las ruinas

Adam Mickiewicz
“True, in her gown she had a fuller figure—but cltohes make some things smaller, some things bigger.”
Adam Mickiewicz, Pan Tadeusz or the Last Foray in Lithuania a Story of Life Among Polish Gentlefolk: In the Years 1811 and 1812 in Twelve Books

Adam Mickiewicz
“Good boozers make good bruisers.”
Adam Mickiewicz, Pan Tadeusz

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
“I don’t know when I started to realize that my country’s past was incomprehensible and obscure to me, a real shadowy terrain, nor can I remember the precise moment when all that i’d believed so trustworthy and predictable—the place I’d grown up, whose language I speak and customs I know, the place whose past I was taught in school and in university, whose present I have become accustomed to interpreting and pretending I understand—began to turn into a place of shadows out of whcih jumped horrible creatures as soon as we dropped our guard. With time I have come to think that this is the true reason why writers write aboutn the places of childhood and adolescence and even their early touth: you don’t write about what you know and understand, and much less do you write because you know and understand, but because you understand that all your knowledge and comprehension is false, a mirage and an illusion, so your books are not, could not be, more than elaborate displays of disorientation: extensive and multifarious declarations of preplexity. All that I thought was so clear, you then think, now turns out to be full of duplicities and hidden intentions, like a friend who betrays us. To that revelation, which is always annoying and often frankly painful, the writer responds in the only way one knows how: with a book. And that’s how you try to mitigate your disconcertion, reduce the space between what you don’t know and what can be known, and most of all resolve your profound disagreement with that unpredictable reality. “Out of the quarrel with others we make rhetoric,” wrote Yeats. “Out of the quarrel with ourselves we make poetry.” And what happens when both quarrels arise at the same time, when fighting with the world is a reflection or a transfiguration of the subterranean but constant confrontation you have with yourself? Then you write a book like the one I’m writing now, and blindly trust that the book will mean something to somebody else.”
Juan Gabriel Vásquez, La forma de las ruinas

163416 KZ Readers — 133 members — last activity Nov 13, 2017 06:31AM
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