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Sky in the Deep
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by Adrienne Young (Goodreads Author)
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Prince in Disguise
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by Stephanie Kate Strohm (Goodreads Author)
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Surprise Me
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by Sophie Kinsella (Goodreads Author)
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Nov 04, 2017 05:42PM

 
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To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
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Everlasting Violet by Jessica Sorensen
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The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli
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The NYC Talon is on page 146 of 432 of The Last Namsara
The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli
The Last Namsara (Iskari, #1)
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More of The NYC Talon's books…
L.M. Montgomery
“Oh, it's delightful to have ambitions. I'm so glad I have such a lot. And there never seems to be any end to them-- that's the best of it. Just as soon as you attain to one ambition you see another one glittering higher up still. It does make life so interesting.”
L. M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

L.M. Montgomery
“People laugh at me because I use big words. But if you have big ideas, you have to use big words to express them, haven't you?”
Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

A.A. Milne
“Piglet sidled up to Pooh from behind.
"Pooh!" he whispered.
"Yes, Piglet?"
"Nothing," said Piglet, taking Pooh's paw. "I just wanted to be sure of you.”
A.A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner

L.M. Montgomery
“My life is a perfect graveyard of buried hopes.”
L.M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

Neil Postman
“We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

190316 Book Club (Young Adult Edition) for Authors Looking directly for Readers — 707 members — last activity Mar 09, 2019 07:51PM
Welcome to the Official Book Club for Authors Looking directly for Readers -- YOUNG ADULT edition