Stephanie Kelley

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Sleepless Nights
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Near the Ocean
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Essayism
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by Brian Dillon (Goodreads Author)
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Stephanie Kelley is currently reading
Sleepless Nights by Elizabeth Hardwick
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Near the Ocean by Robert Lowell
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Too Much and Not the Mood by Durga Chew-Bose
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Debths by Susan Howe
Debths
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Too Much and Not the Mood by Durga Chew-Bose
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Debths by Susan Howe
Debths
by Susan Howe (Goodreads Author)
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Essayism by Brian Dillon
Essayism
by Brian Dillon (Goodreads Author)
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Daily Rituals by Mason Currey
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Sin and Syntax by Constance Hale
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Field Guide by Robert Hass
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More of Stephanie's books…
Virginia Woolf
“To look life in the face, always, to look life in the face, and to know it for what it is...at last, to love it for what it is, and then, to put it away...”
Virginia Woolf

Ian McEwan
“He's never quite got the trick of conversation, tending to hear in dissenting views, however mild, a kind of affront, an invitation to mortal combat.”
Ian McEwan, Saturday

David Foster Wallace
“If what's always distinguished bad writing--flat characters, a narrative world that's clichéd and not recognizably human, etc.--is also a description of today's world, then bad writing becomes an ingenious mimesis of a bad world. If readers simply believe the world is stupid and shallow and mean, then [Bret] Ellis can write a mean shallow stupid novel that becomes a mordant deadpan commentary on the badness of everything. Look man, we'd probably most of us agree that these are dark times, and stupid ones, but do we need fiction that does nothing but dramatize how dark and stupid everything is? In dark times, the definition of good art would seem to be art that locates and applies CPR to those elements of what's human and magical that still live and glow despite the times' darkness. Really good fiction could have as dark a worldview as it wished, but it'd find a way both to depict this world and to illuminate the possibilities for being alive and human in it.

Postmodern irony and cynicism's become an end in itself, a measure of hip sophistication and literary savvy. Few artists dare to try to talk about ways of working toward redeeming what's wrong, because they'll look sentimental and naive to all the weary ironists. Irony's gone from liberating to enslaving. There's some great essay somewhere that has a line about irony being the song of the prisoner who's come to love his cage… The postmodern founders' patricidal work was great, but patricide produces orphans, and no amount of revelry can make up for the fact that writers my age have been literary orphans throughout our formative years.

We enter a spiritual puberty where we snap to the fact that the great transcendent horror is loneliness, excluded encagement in the self. Once we’ve hit this age, we will now give or take anything, wear any mask, to fit, be part-of, not be Alone, we young. The U.S. arts are our guide to inclusion. A how-to. We are shown how to fashion masks of ennui and jaded irony at a young age where the face is fictile enough to assume the shape of whatever it wears. And then it’s stuck there, the weary cynicism that saves us from gooey sentiment and unsophisticated naïveté. Sentiment equals naïveté on this continent.

You burn with hunger for food that does not exist.

A U. S. of modern A. where the State is not a team or a code, but a sort of sloppy intersection of desires and fears, where the only public consensus a boy must surrender to is the acknowledged primacy of straight-line pursuing this flat and short-sighted idea of personal happiness.”
David Foster Wallace

Virginia Woolf
“When the Day of Judgment dawns and people, great and small, come marching in to receive their heavenly rewards, the Almighty will gaze upon the mere bookworms and say to Peter, “Look, these need no reward. We have nothing to give them. They have loved reading.”
Virginia Woolf

Ian McEwan
“There are these rare moments when musicians together touch something sweeter than they've ever found before in rehearsals or performance, beyond the merely collaborative or technically proficient, when their expression becomes as easy and graceful as friendship or love. This is when they give us a glimpse of what we might be, of our best selves, and of an impossible world in which you give everything to others, but lose nothing of yourself.”
Ian McEwan, Saturday

71974 Let's Pretend This Never Happened Book Club — 1274 members — last activity Apr 10, 2013 04:49PM
A (probably temporary) book club created to discuss "Let's Pretend This Never Happened" while home, in our pajamas and (optional) drunk. It will be aw ...more
600 Gothic Literature — 863 members — last activity Apr 21, 2017 03:40PM
Discussing the darker aspects of 18th - 21st century literature. If you cannot find a topic you are interested in feel free to create a new thread for ...more
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