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The Girl Who Play...
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Oct 15, 2017 11:44PM

 
A Clash of Kings
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Sep 26, 2017 11:48PM

 
The 4 Disciplines...
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Sep 11, 2017 03:56AM

 
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The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson
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The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz
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The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz
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The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson
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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
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A Storm of Swords by George R.R. Martin
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Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
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A Clash of Kings by George R.R. Martin
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Jonas Jonasson
“Revenge is like politics, one thing always leads to another until bad has become worse, and worse has become worst.”
Jonas Jonasson, The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared

Matt Ridley
“Random violence makes the news precisely because it is so rare, routine kindness does not make the news precisely because it is so commonplace. (104)”
Matt Ridley, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves

Richard Feynman
“I believe, therefore, that although it is not the case today, that there may some day come a time, I should hope, when it will be fully appreciated that the power of government should be limited; that governments ought not to be empowered to decide the validity of scientific theories, that that is a ridiculous thing for them to try to do; that they are not to decide the various descriptions of history or of economic theory or of philosophy. Only in this way can the real possibilities of the future human race be ultimately developed.”
Richard Feynman, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman

Matt Ridley
“Arguably, the orang-utan, being devastated by the loss of forest to palm oil bio-fuel plantations in Borneo, is under greater threat from renewable energy than the polar bear is from global warming.”
Matt Ridley, The Rational Optimist

Matt Ridley
“The Sun King had dinner each night alone. He chose from forty dishes, served on gold and silver plate. It took a staggering 498 people to prepare each meal. He was rich because he consumed the work of other people, mainly in the form of their services. He was rich because other people did things for him. At that time, the average French family would have prepared and consumed its own meals as well as paid tax to support his servants in the palace. So it is not hard to conclude that Louis XIV was rich because others were poor.

But what about today? Consider that you are an average person, say a woman of 35, living in, for the sake of argument, Paris and earning the median wage, with a working husband and two children. You are far from poor, but in relative terms, you are immeasurably poorer than Louis was. Where he was the richest of the rich in the world’s richest city, you have no servants, no palace, no carriage, no kingdom. As you toil home from work on the crowded Metro, stopping at the shop on the way to buy a ready meal for four, you might be thinking that Louis XIV’s dining arrangements were way beyond your reach. And yet consider this. The cornucopia that greets you as you enter the supermarket dwarfs anything that Louis XIV ever experienced (and it is probably less likely to contain salmonella). You can buy a fresh, frozen, tinned, smoked or pre-prepared meal made with beef, chicken, pork, lamb, fish, prawns, scallops, eggs, potatoes, beans, carrots, cabbage, aubergine, kumquats, celeriac, okra, seven kinds of lettuce, cooked in olive, walnut, sunflower or peanut oil and flavoured with cilantro, turmeric, basil or rosemary … You may have no chefs, but you can decide on a whim to choose between scores of nearby bistros, or Italian, Chinese, Japanese or Indian restaurants, in each of which a team of skilled chefs is waiting to serve your family at less than an hour’s notice. Think of this: never before this generation has the average person been able to afford to have somebody else prepare his meals.

You employ no tailor, but you can browse the internet and instantly order from an almost infinite range of excellent, affordable clothes of cotton, silk, linen, wool and nylon made up for you in factories all over Asia. You have no carriage, but you can buy a ticket which will summon the services of a skilled pilot of a budget airline to fly you to one of hundreds of destinations that Louis never dreamed of seeing. You have no woodcutters to bring you logs for the fire, but the operators of gas rigs in Russia are clamouring to bring you clean central heating. You have no wick-trimming footman, but your light switch gives you the instant and brilliant produce of hardworking people at a grid of distant nuclear power stations. You have no runner to send messages, but even now a repairman is climbing a mobile-phone mast somewhere in the world to make sure it is working properly just in case you need to call that cell. You have no private apothecary, but your local pharmacy supplies you with the handiwork of many thousands of chemists, engineers and logistics experts. You have no government ministers, but diligent reporters are even now standing ready to tell you about a film star’s divorce if you will only switch to their channel or log on to their blogs.

My point is that you have far, far more than 498 servants at your immediate beck and call. Of course, unlike the Sun King’s servants, these people work for many other people too, but from your perspective what is the difference? That is the magic that exchange and specialisation have wrought for the human species.”
Matt Ridley, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves

89458 Čeští a slovenští blázni do anglických knížek — 305 members — last activity Oct 08, 2017 06:23AM
Štve vás, že je do našeho jazyka přeložen jen zlomek YA a ostatní literatury? Chcete si procvičit angličtinu? Milujete pocit čtení v cizím jazyce? Pak ...more
83703 Čtenářský klub Cz/Sk — 336 members — last activity Oct 17, 2017 03:05AM
Skupina pro česky (a slovensky) mluvící lidi, kde si můžeme každý měsíc povídat o knihách všeho druhu a jednou za čas taky rozebrat knížku, kterou jsm ...more
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