Giselle
2178 ratings (3.82 avg)
37 reviews

#149 top reviewers
#40 best reviewers
#7 top readers

Giselle

Add friend
Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Giselle.


Lost Children Arc...
Giselle is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
No contar todo
Giselle is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
Opus Gelber. Retr...
Rate this book
Clear rating

 
See all 4 books that Giselle is reading…

Giselle’s Recent Updates

Giselle rated a book really liked it
Nightwood by Djuna Barnes
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle and 114 other people liked Jeffrey Keeten's review of Nightwood:
Nightwood by Djuna Barnes
"”’You know what man really desires?’ inquired the doctor, grinning into the immobile face of the Baron. ‘One of two things: to find someone who is so stupid that he can lie to her, or to love someone so much that she can lie to him.’”

 photo Nightwood Backless Dress_zpsh8sdfbye.jpg

Baron Felix..." Read more of this review »
Giselle rated a book really liked it
Nightwood by Djuna Barnes
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle rated a book it was amazing
Body Bereft by Antjie Krog
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle is now following
Giselle is currently reading
Body Bereft by Antjie Krog
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle is currently reading
Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle is currently reading
No contar todo by Emiliano Monge
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle started reading
Opus Gelber. Retrato de un pianista by Leila Guerriero
Rate this book
Clear rating
Giselle rated a book really liked it
Local Histories/Global Designs by Walter D. Mignolo
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Giselle's books…
“The problem with borders, I was beginning to realize, isn't that they are monstrous, offensive, and unnatural constructions. The problem with borders is the same as the problem with evil that Hannah Arendt identified: their banality. We subconsciously accept them as part of the landscape--at least those of us privileged by them, granted meaningful passports--because they articulate our deepest, least exalted desires, for prestige and permanence, order and security, always at the cost of someone or something else. Borders reinforce the idea of the alien, the Other, stories separate and distinct from ourselves. But would such fictions continue to stand if most of us didn't agree with them, or at least quietly benefit from the inequalities they bolster? The barbed wire begins here, inside us, cutting through our very core.”
Kate Harris

Robert Graves
“He also said that everyone died of drink in Limerick except the Plymouth Brethren, who died of religious melancholia.”
Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That

David Sedaris
“Happiness is harder to put into words. It’s also harder to source, much more mysterious than anger or sorrow, which come to me promptly, whenever I summon them, and remain long after I’ve begged them to leave.”
David Sedaris, Calypso

David Sedaris
“When visitors leave, I feel like an actor watching the audience file out of the theater, and it was no different with my sisters. The show over, Hugh and I returned to lesser versions of ourselves. We’re not a horrible couple, but we have our share of fights, the type that can start with a misplaced sock and suddenly be about everything. “I haven’t liked you since 2002,” he hissed during a recent argument over which airport security line was moving the fastest.”
David Sedaris, Calypso

John Berger
“Later, when I was in the Argentine, I used to tell myself that I could not die until I had seen another month of May, here in the mountains. The grass grows knee-high in the meadows and down the centre of the roads between the wheel ruts. If you are with a friend, you walk down the road with the grass between you. In the forest the late beech leaves come out, the greenest leaves in the world. The cows are let out of the stable for the first time. They leap, kick with their hind legs, turn in circles, jump like goats. The month itself is like a homecoming.”
John Berger, Pig Earth