Brenda Chen

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The Meaning of Ha...
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21 Lessons for th...
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She Means Busines...
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See all 12 books that Brenda is reading…
Book cover for Shoe Dog
Like all my friends I wanted to be successful. Unlike my friends I didn’t know what that meant. Money? Maybe. Wife? Kids? House? Sure, if I was lucky. These were the goals I was taught to aspire to, and part of me did aspire to them, ...more

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Atomic Habits by James Clear
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HBR's 10 Must Reads on Mental Toughness (with bonus interview... by Harvard Business Review
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Brenda Chen has completed her goal of reading 50 books for the 2018 Reading Challenge!
 
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WorkParty by Jaclyn Johnson
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Liar's Poker by Michael   Lewis
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How to Own Your Own Mind by Napoleon Hill
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You Can Work Your Own Miracles by Napoleon Hill
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Manage Your Day-to-Day by Jocelyn K. Glei
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The Everything Store by Brad Stone
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Grit by Angela Duckworth
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More of Brenda's books…
Ian McEwan
“Imagining what it is like to be someone other than yourself is at the core of our humanity. It is the essence of compassion and the beginning of morality”
Ian McEwan

Atul Gawande
“Being mortal is about the struggle to cope with the constraints of our biology, with the limits set by genes and cells and flesh and bone. Medical science has given us remarkable power to push against these limits, and the potential value of this power was a central reason I became a doctor. But again and again, I have seen the damage we in medicine do when we fail to acknowledge that such power is finite and always will be. We’ve been wrong about what our job is in medicine. We think our job is to ensure health and survival. But really it is larger than that. It is to enable well-being. And well-being is about the reasons one wishes to be alive. Those reasons matter not just at the end of life, or when debility comes, but all along the way. Whenever serious sickness or injury strikes and your body or mind breaks down, the vital questions are the same: What is your understanding of the situation and its potential outcomes? What are your fears and what are your hopes? What are the trade-offs you are willing to make and not willing to make? And what is the course of action that best serves this understanding?”
Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Aldous Huxley
“We live together, we act on, and react to, one another; but always and in all circumstances we are by ourselves. The martyrs go hand in hand into the arena; they are crucified alone. Embraced, the lovers desperately try to fuse their insulated ecstasies into a single self-transcendence; in vain. By its very nature every embodied spirit is doomed to suffer and enjoy in solitude. Sensations, feelings, insights, fancies—all these are private and, except through symbols and at second hand, incommunicable. We can pool information about experiences, but never the experiences themselves. From family to nation, every human group is a society of island universes.”
Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception

Ernest Hemingway
“There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.”
Ernest Hemingway

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz
“Our essential connection with animals is ancient, and it runs deep. It extends from body to behavior, from psychology to society—forming the basis of our daily journey of survival. This calls for physicians and patients to think beyond the human bedside to barnyards, jungles, oceans, and skies. Because the fate of our world’s health doesn’t depend solely on how we humans fare. Rather it will be determined by how all the patients on the planet live, grow, get sick, and heal.”
Barbara Natterson-Horowitz