Ellie Dottie

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History of Violence
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The Golden Notebook
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Pieces of Her
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by Karin Slaughter (Goodreads Author)
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  (page 100 of 480)
Oct 11, 2018 07:36PM

 

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History of Violence by Édouard Louis
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The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
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Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay
Bad Feminist
by Roxane Gay (Goodreads Author)
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Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
“Do not forget, do not ever forget, that you have promised me to use the money to make yourself an honest man.'

Valjean, who did not recall having made any promise, was silent. The bishop had spoken the words slowly and deliberately. He concluded with a solemn emphasis:

Jean Valjean, my brother, you no longer belong to what is evil but to what is good. I have bought your soul to save it from black thoughts and the spirit of perdition, and I give it to God.”
Victor Hugo
Ellie Dottie is on page 300 of 385 of The Widows of Malabar Hill
The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey
The Widows of Malabar Hill (Perveen Mistry, #1)
by Sujata Massey (Goodreads Author)
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Heartland by Sarah Smarsh
"From the NBA shortlist for non-fiction comes this memoir about growing up poor in a “flyover” state. While I can agree with a lot of what she says about growing up in a rural setting, I sometimes felt she over-dramatized some of it. That in additi..." Read more of this review »
One Person, No Vote by Carol  Anderson
"As in her previous book, White Rage, Carol Anderson packs a ton of information into a small space with One Person, No Vote. This overview of voter suppression in America, from Reconstruction into the present day, will enrage you. As it should."
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Miles Morales by Jason Reynolds
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I loved this book! I was completely swept away by the story. I really enjoyed all the different aspects of this book. It was telling the story of a teenage boy: his nervousness when talking to his crush, his relationship with his parents and how he u ...more
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J.K. Rowling
“Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic. Capable of both inflicting injury, and remedying it.”
JK Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Theodore Roosevelt
“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”
Theodore Roosevelt

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“One of my most vivid memories is of coming back West from prep school and later from college at Christmas time. Those who went farther than Chicago would gather in the old dim Union Station at six o’clock of a December evening, with a few Chicago friends, already caught up into their own holiday gayeties, to bid them a hasty good-by. I remember the fur coats of the girls returning from Miss This-or-that’s and the chatter of frozen breath and the hands waving overhead as we caught sight of old acquaintances, and the matchings of invitations: “Are you going to the Ordways’? the Herseys’? the Schultzes’?” and the long green tickets clasped tight in our gloved hands. And last the murky yellow cars of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad looking cheerful as Christmas itself on the tracks beside the gate.

When we pulled out into the winter night and the real snow, our snow, began to stretch out beside us and twinkle against the windows, and the dim lights of small Wisconsin stations moved by, a sharp wild brace came suddenly into the air. We drew in deep breaths of it as we walked back from dinner through the cold vestibules, unutterably aware of our identity with this country for one strange hour, before we melted indistinguishably into it again.

That’s my Middle West — not the wheat or the prairies or the lost Swede towns, but the thrilling returning trains of my youth, and the street lamps and sleigh bells in the frosty dark and the shadows of holly wreaths thrown by lighted windows on the snow. I am part of that, a little solemn with the feel of those long winters, a little complacent from growing up in the Carraway house in a city where dwellings are still called through decades by a family’s name. I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all — Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and I, were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life.”
F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Victor Hugo
“Do not forget, do not ever forget, that you have promised me to use the money to make yourself an honest man.'

Valjean, who did not recall having made any promise, was silent. The bishop had spoken the words slowly and deliberately. He concluded with a solemn emphasis:

Jean Valjean, my brother, you no longer belong to what is evil but to what is good. I have bought your soul to save it from black thoughts and the spirit of perdition, and I give it to God.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

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