Karina Petersen

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https://crossingjourneys.wordpress.com/

The Water Dancer
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  (page 60 of 403)
Jan 19, 2020 02:35PM

 
Sandheden om Harr...
Karina Petersen is currently reading
Reading for the 2nd time
read in December, 2018
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Karina Petersen Karina Petersen said: " Hold op sikke en roman! "

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  (page 500 of 704)
Jan 17, 2020 04:17PM

 
De fire vinde
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by Helle Ryding (Goodreads Author)
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read in January, 2012
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  (page 280 of 309)
Jan 13, 2020 03:36PM

 
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Mythos by Stephen Fry
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Stephen is on page 104 of 374 of The Ten Thousand Doors of January
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Cathal Kenneally is on page 113 of 210 of The War of the Worlds
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Du skal ikke være dig selv by Lars Lundmann
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Du skal ikke være dig selv by Lars Lundmann
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Circe by Madeline Miller
Circe
by Madeline Miller (Goodreads Author)
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Mellem verden og mig by Ta-Nehisi Coates
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Hmmm, jeg er ikke nær så fanget af bogen ved min genlæsning. “Mellem verden og mig” er uden tvivl et rigtig vigtig postkolonialt værk fortalt med en stemme, som prøver at finde og føle sig hjemme i den hvide verden og ikke mindst i den amerikanske ...more
Which series should I start next month?

She voted for: The Raven Boys
Mellem verden og mig by Ta-Nehisi Coates
" Ja, det er vildt, som hans ord rammer! Jeg har læst den flere gange, og lige nu lytter jeg til bogen, men bliver lige ramt, hver gang! "
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Ta-Nehisi Coates
“White America” is a syndicate arrayed to protect its exclusive power to dominate and control our bodies. Sometimes this power is direct (lynching), and sometimes it is insidious (redlining). But however it appears, the power of domination and exclusion is central to the belief in being white, and without it, “white people” would cease to exist for want of reasons. There will surely always be people with straight hair and blue eyes, as there have been for all history. But some of these straight-haired people with blue eyes have been “black,” and this points to the great difference between their world and ours. We did not choose our fences. They were imposed on us by Virginia planters obsessed with enslaving as many Americans as possible. They are the ones who came up with a one-drop rule that separated the “white” from the “black,” even if it meant that their own blue-eyed sons would live under the lash. The result is a people, black people, who embody all physical varieties and whose life stories mirror this physical range. Through The Mecca I saw that we were, in our own segregated body politic, cosmopolitans. The black diaspora was not just our own world but, in so many ways, the Western world itself.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me

Ta-Nehisi Coates
“The two great divisions of society are not the rich and poor, but white and black,” said the great South Carolina senator John C. Calhoun. “And all the former, the poor as well as the rich, belong to the upper class, and are respected and treated as equals.” And there it is—the right to break the black body as the meaning of their sacred equality. And that right has always given them meaning, has always meant that there was someone down in the valley because a mountain is not a mountain if there is nothing below.*”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me

Ta-Nehisi Coates
“Black is beautiful—which is to say that the black body is beautiful, that black hair must be guarded against the torture of processing and lye, that black skin must be guarded against bleach, that our noses and mouths must be protected against modern surgery. We are all our beautiful bodies and so must never be prostrate before barbarians, must never submit our original self, our one of one, to defiling and plunder.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me

George R.R. Martin
“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.”
George R.R. Martin, A Dance with Dragons

Mortimer J. Adler
“Reading list (1972 edition)[edit]
1. Homer – Iliad, Odyssey
2. The Old Testament
3. Aeschylus – Tragedies
4. Sophocles – Tragedies
5. Herodotus – Histories
6. Euripides – Tragedies
7. Thucydides – History of the Peloponnesian War
8. Hippocrates – Medical Writings
9. Aristophanes – Comedies
10. Plato – Dialogues
11. Aristotle – Works
12. Epicurus – Letter to Herodotus; Letter to Menoecus
13. Euclid – Elements
14. Archimedes – Works
15. Apollonius of Perga – Conic Sections
16. Cicero – Works
17. Lucretius – On the Nature of Things
18. Virgil – Works
19. Horace – Works
20. Livy – History of Rome
21. Ovid – Works
22. Plutarch – Parallel Lives; Moralia
23. Tacitus – Histories; Annals; Agricola Germania
24. Nicomachus of Gerasa – Introduction to Arithmetic
25. Epictetus – Discourses; Encheiridion
26. Ptolemy – Almagest
27. Lucian – Works
28. Marcus Aurelius – Meditations
29. Galen – On the Natural Faculties
30. The New Testament
31. Plotinus – The Enneads
32. St. Augustine – On the Teacher; Confessions; City of God; On Christian Doctrine
33. The Song of Roland
34. The Nibelungenlied
35. The Saga of Burnt Njál
36. St. Thomas Aquinas – Summa Theologica
37. Dante Alighieri – The Divine Comedy;The New Life; On Monarchy
38. Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde; The Canterbury Tales
39. Leonardo da Vinci – Notebooks
40. Niccolò Machiavelli – The Prince; Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
41. Desiderius Erasmus – The Praise of Folly
42. Nicolaus Copernicus – On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
43. Thomas More – Utopia
44. Martin Luther – Table Talk; Three Treatises
45. François Rabelais – Gargantua and Pantagruel
46. John Calvin – Institutes of the Christian Religion
47. Michel de Montaigne – Essays
48. William Gilbert – On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
49. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
50. Edmund Spenser – Prothalamion; The Faerie Queene
51. Francis Bacon – Essays; Advancement of Learning; Novum Organum, New Atlantis
52. William Shakespeare – Poetry and Plays
53. Galileo Galilei – Starry Messenger; Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
54. Johannes Kepler – Epitome of Copernican Astronomy; Concerning the Harmonies of the World
55. William Harvey – On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals; On the Circulation of the Blood; On the Generation of Animals
56. Thomas Hobbes – Leviathan
57. René Descartes – Rules for the Direction of the Mind; Discourse on the Method; Geometry; Meditations on First Philosophy
58. John Milton – Works
59. Molière – Comedies
60. Blaise Pascal – The Provincial Letters; Pensees; Scientific Treatises
61. Christiaan Huygens – Treatise on Light
62. Benedict de Spinoza – Ethics
63. John Locke – Letter Concerning Toleration; Of Civil Government; Essay Concerning Human Understanding;Thoughts Concerning Education
64. Jean Baptiste Racine – Tragedies
65. Isaac Newton – Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy; Optics
66. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz – Discourse on Metaphysics; New Essays Concerning Human Understanding;Monadology
67. Daniel Defoe – Robinson Crusoe
68. Jonathan Swift – A Tale of a Tub; Journal to Stella; Gulliver's Travels; A Modest Proposal
69. William Congreve – The Way of the World
70. George Berkeley – Principles of Human Knowledge
71. Alexander Pope – Essay on Criticism; Rape of the Lock; Essay on Man
72. Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu – Persian Letters; Spirit of Laws
73. Voltaire – Letters on the English; Candide; Philosophical Dictionary
74. Henry Fielding – Joseph Andrews; Tom Jones
75. Samuel Johnson – The Vanity of Human Wishes; Dictionary; Rasselas; The Lives of the Poets”
Mortimer J. Adler, How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading

26678 Danske Læsere / Danmark — 1484 members — last activity 21 hours, 36 min ago
En gruppe for læsere af dansk litteratur, eller bare danske læsere af verdenslitteratur. Kan du dansk eller interesserer dig for Danmark er du ...more
179584 Our Shared Shelf — 230724 members — last activity 9 minutes ago
Dear Readers, As part of my work with UN Women, I have started reading as many books and essays about equality as I can get my hands on. There is so ...more
636120 The Cool Kids' Fantasy Club — 1397 members — last activity Jan 23, 2020 05:52AM
A group to chat about SFF books. Authors and readers welcome. I might post about my books and the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off too. I plan on ...more
95296 All About Fantasy! — 522 members — last activity Jan 25, 2020 08:53PM
This group is for anyone who likes fantasy books of all kinds. Whether it's magic, vampires, zombies, fairies or anything else imaginable, this is the ...more
219252 Forgotten YA Gems — 714 members — last activity Jan 24, 2020 03:17PM
Welcome to Forgotten YA Gems! Forgotten YA Gems is a Goodreads group that reads YA, NA, or MG books that are at least five years old. While not ...more
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