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The Heart Is a Lo...
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On Food and Cooki...
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Everything That R...
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Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges
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CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
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Tenth of December by George Saunders
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Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees by Lawrence Weschler
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Heroes And Villains by Steven Gaines
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Written much in the voice of a "VH1's Behind the Music" transcription, it's trashy, it's drama, but a fun read, nonetheless. So many incredible things I did not know about the Beach Boys. Listening to their songs with new ears alone makes this a wort ...more
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The Man Who Ate Everything by Jeffrey Steingarten
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Susan and 2 other people liked r's review of The Mezzanine:
The Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker
"about a year after i read this book, just before lunch one sunny afternoon at work, i untied and retied my shoelaces as the left shoe was feeling loose, a feeling that grated with me slightly;* not enough to have rectified it all morning, yet enou..." Read more of this review »
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The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil
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The Man Without Qualities by Robert Musil
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Rabbit Redux by John Updike
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More of Susan's books…
Dante Alighieri
“Here sighs and cries and shrieks of lamentation
echoed throughout the starless air of Hell;
at first these sounds resounding made me weep:

tongues confused, a language strained in anguish
with cadences of anger, shrill outcries
and raucous groans that joined with sounds of hands,
raising a whirling storm that turns itself
forever through that air of endless black,
like grains of sand swirling when a whirlwind blows.

And I, in the midst of all this circling horror,
began, "Teacher, what are these sounds I hear?
What souls are these so overwhelmed by grief?"

And he to me: "This wretched state of being
is the fate of those sad souls who lived a life
but lived it with no blame and with no praise.
They are mixed with that repulsive choir of angels
neither faithful nor unfaithful to their God,
who undecided stood but for themselves.

Heaven, to keep its beauty, cast them out,
but even Hell itself would not receive them,
for fear the damned might glory over them."

And I. "Master, what torments do they suffer
that force them to lament so bitterly?"
He answered: "I will tell you in few words:

these wretches have no hope of truly dying,
and this blind life they lead is so abject
it makes them envy every other fate.

The world will not record their having been there;
Heaven's mercy and its justice turn from them.
Let's not discuss them; look and pass them by...”
Dante Alighieri

John Updike
“Nelson! Stop that this minute!" She turns rigid in the glider but does not rise to see what is making the boy cry. Eccles, sitting by the screen, can see. The Fosnacht boy stands by the swing, holding two red plastic trucks. Angstrom's son, some inches shorter, is batting with an open hand toward the bigger boy's chest, but does not quite dare to move forward a step and actually strike him...Nelson's face turns up toward the porch and he tries to explain, "Pilly have - Pilly -" But just trying to describe the injustice gives it unbearable force, and as if struck from behind he totters forward and slaps the thief's chest and receives a mild shove that makes him sit on the ground. He rolls on his stomach and spins in the grass, revolved by his own incoherent kicking. Eccles' heart seems to twist with the child's body; he knows so well the propulsive power of a wrong, the way the mind batters against it and each futile blow sucks the air emptier until it seems the whole frame of blood and bone must burst in a universe that can be such a vacuum.”
John Updike, Rabbit, Run

John Updike
“Whatever men make," she says, "what they felt when they made it is there...Man is a means for turning things into spirit and turning spirit into things.”
John Updike

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