Ahmad Alhour

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Designing Data-In...
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Café in Berlin
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Designing Data-Intensive Applications by Martin Kleppmann
Designing Data-Intensive Applications
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Building Microservices by Sam Newman
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Designing Data-Intensive Applications by Martin Kleppmann
Designing Data-Intensive Applications
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The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson
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2.5/5 stars. It's important to mention that the narrator's performance (I listened to the audiobook) is awesome and he deserves 5/5 stars.

The book is an easy and fun read but that's that. If you're familiar with famous topics such as Stoicism and Bud
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Jack Donovan
“Men cannot be men—much less good or heroic men—unless their actions have meaningful consequences to people they truly care about. Strength requires an opposing force, courage requires risk, mastery requires hard work, honor requires accountability to other men. Without these things, we are little more than boys playing at being men, and there is no weekend retreat or mantra or half-assed rite of passage that can change that. A rite of passage must reflect a real change in status and responsibility for it to be anything more than theater. No reimagined manhood of convenience can hold its head high so long as the earth remains the tomb of our ancestors”
Jack Donovan, The Way of Men

Friedrich Nietzsche
“The most spiritual men, as the strongest, find their happiness where others would find their destruction: in the labyrinth, in hardness against themselves and others, in experiments. Their joy is self-conquest: asceticism becomes in them nature, need, and instinct. Difficult tasks are a privilege to them; to play with burdens that crush others, a recreation. Knowledge–a form of asceticism. They are the most venerable kind of man: that does not preclude their being the most cheerful and the kindliest.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, The Anti-Christ

Alfred Adler
“It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them.”
Alfred Adler

Willard Van Orman Quine
“As an empiricist I continue to think of the conceptual scheme of science as a tool, ultimately, for predicting future experience in the light of past experience. Physical objects are conceptually imported into the situation as convenient intermediaries-not by definition in terms of experience, but simply as irreducible posits comparable, epistemologically, to the gods of Homer. For my part I do, qua lay physicist, believe in physical objects and not in Homer's gods; and I consider it a scientific error to believe otherwise. But in point of epistemological footing the physical objects and the gods differ only in degree and not in kind. Both sorts of entities enter our conception only as cultural posits. The myth of physical objects is epistemologically superior to most in that it has proved more efficacious than other myths as a device for working a manageable structure into the flux of experience.”
Willard Van Orman Quine, From a Logical Point of View: Nine Logico-Philosophical Essays

Friedrich Nietzsche
“There is not enough love and goodness in the world to permit giving any of it away to imaginary beings.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits

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