Anna

Add friend
Sign in to Goodreads to learn more about Anna.

https://www.goodreads.com/annadunlavey8

Harry Potter and ...
Rate this book
Clear rating

progress: 
 
  (page 250 of 870)
15 hours, 34 min ago

 
War and Peace
Anna is currently reading
bookshelves: currently-reading
Rate this book
Clear rating

 

Anna’s Recent Updates

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
The Golovlyov Family by M.E. Saltykov-Shchedrin
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna is currently reading
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
General James Longstreet by Jeffry D. Wert
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
Final Draft by Riley Redgate
Final Draft
by Riley Redgate (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
Rules of Civility by Amor Towles
Rules of Civility
by Amor Towles (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna rated a book it was amazing
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
A Gentleman in Moscow
by Amor Towles (Goodreads Author)
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
America (The Book) by Jon Stewart
Rate this book
Clear rating
Anna wants to read
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
Rate this book
Clear rating
More of Anna's books…
J.D. Salinger
“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though.”
J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Oh I've plenty of time, my time is entirely my own.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Идиот

Oscar Wilde
“I am so clever that sometimes I don't understand a single word of what I am saying.”
Oscar Wilde, The Happy Prince and Other Stories

Charles Dickens
“We need never be ashamed of our tears.”
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Some sleepers have intelligent faces even in sleep, while other faces, even intelligent ones, become very stupid in sleep and therefore ridiculous. I don't know what makes that happen; I only want to say that a laughing man, like a sleeping one, most often knows nothing about his face. A great many people don't know how to laugh at all. However, there's nothing to know here: it's a gift, and it can't be fabricated. It can only be fabricated by re-educating oneself, developing oneself for the better, and overcoming the bad instincts of one's character; then the laughter of such a person might quite possibly change for the better. A man can give himself away completely by his laughter, so that you suddenly learn all of his innermost secrets. Even indisputably intelligent laughter is sometimes repulsive. Laughter calls first of all for sincerity, and where does one find sincerity? Laughter calls for lack of spite, but people most often laugh spitefully. Sincere and unspiteful laughter is mirth. A man's mirth is a feature that gives away the whole man, from head to foot. Someone's character won't be cracked for a long time, then the man bursts out laughing somehow quite sincerely, and his whole character suddenly opens up as if on the flat of your hand. Only a man of the loftiest and happiest development knows how to be mirthful infectiously, that is, irresistibly and goodheartedly. I'm not speaking of his mental development, but of his character, of the whole man. And so, if you want to discern a man and know his soul, you must look, not at how he keeps silent, or how he speaks, or how he weeps, or even how he is stirred by the noblest ideas, but you had better look at him when he laughs. If a man has a good laugh, it means he's a good man. Note at the same time all the nuances: for instance, a man's laughter must in no case seem stupid to you, however merry and simplehearted it may be. The moment you notice the slightest trace of stupidity in someone's laughter, it undoubtedly means that the man is of limited intelligence, though he may do nothing but pour out ideas. Or if his laughter isn't stupid, but the man himself, when he laughs, for some reason suddenly seems ridiculous to you, even just slightly—know, then, that the man has no real sense of dignity, not fully in any case. Or finally, if his laughter is infectious, but for some reason still seems banal to you, know, then, that the man's nature is on the banal side as well, and all the noble and lofty that you noticed in him before is either deliberately affected or unconsciously borrowed, and later on the man is certain to change for the worse, to take up what's 'useful' and throw his noble ideas away without regret, as the errors and infatuations of youth.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Adolescent

87031 Ask John Green - January 23, 2013 — 5397 members — last activity Feb 08, 2017 07:28AM
Join us on Wednesday, January 23, 2013 for a special discussion with award winning author John Green. John will be discussing his work, including his ...more
163362 ZKA Book Club — 7 members — last activity Jan 02, 2018 10:36PM
a bunch of nerds
See your year in books badge
Jake Ge...
35 books | 116 friends

Kim
Kim
404 books | 170 friends

Jenna Nobs
224 books | 79 friends

Rosemary
372 books | 626 friends

Jane
178 books | 19 friends

Dan
Dan
1,128 books | 64 friends

Sarah L
294 books | 80 friends

Maryrita
480 books | 11 friends

More friends…

Quizzes and Trivia

questions answered:
297 (0.1%)

correct:
211 (71.0%)

skipped:
112 (27.4%)

69258 out of 2452756

streak:
0

best streak:
8

questions added:
0



Polls voted on by Anna

Lists liked by Anna