Amy VanHym

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Explaining Postmo...
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Jul 17, 2018 11:09AM

 
Meditations
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Jul 04, 2018 12:58PM

 
The Collector's B...
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See all 6 books that Amy is reading…

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Mindful Birthing by Nancy Bardacke
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Patronizing and disabling. Talks down to the reader from the very start. The author plays word games under a pretense of wisdom:

"Occasionally [...] a pregnant woman will say something about wanting 'a natural childbirth.' If that comes up, I gently e
...more
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Hedgewitch Botanical Oracle by Siolo Thompson
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This large and promising-looking guidebook is poisoned with toxic Feminist dogma. I'm so disappointed I could cry. I really thought I had found a good one this time, but right at the start of the introduction, this author makes her hatred of her fell ...more
Amy VanHym rated a book did not like it
Archetype Cards [Booklet and Card Deck] by Caroline Myss
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The good -- A great concept, a generous number of cards, and six blank bonus cards to personalize the deck.

The bad -- This deck features hideously amateurish artwork in a style harkening back to the drudgery of dragging myself through my uninspired
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The Wisdom of Trees Oracle by Jane Struthers
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The art is pleasant, peaceful and consistently styled. The content in the booklet is arranged nicely, but the writing itself is, as befalls so many oracle decks, patronizing, unmystical, and ego-focused. By ego-focused, I mean that it contains many " ...more
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The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukianoff
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"The Coddling of the American Mind: In which we Coddle the American Coddlers."

This book pokes the villains with a few soft cushions. It assumes "good intentions" without bothering to prove the point, and even does so while describing clearly bad-int
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Amy VanHym rated a book it was ok
Earth Magic Oracle Cards by Steven D. Farmer
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I bought this for two reasons: reverence for nature, and a male author. I hoped that having a man at the helm would imbue this deck's guidebook with more objectivity and sanity, and less harebrained nonsensical spiritual weasel-wording, than other de ...more
Amy VanHym rated a book really liked it
The Hermetic Tarot by Godfrey Dowson
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The art on the cards is complex, detailed, consistent and symbolically very interesting, despite being crippled in the realm of aesthetics, symmetry and proportion. The accompanying guidebook is physically flimsy yet is also densely packed with usefu ...more
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Elevation by Stephen King
Elevation
by Stephen King (Goodreads Author)
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Cornball marketing, stilted prose, lifeless dialogue, flat characters. Uninspired and uninspiring. Nearsighted, passive-aggressive and sanctimonious. King doesn't just fail to step outside his comfort zone; he's stuck in the very centre of it. As the ...more
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Mystical Shaman Oracle Cards by Alberto Villoldo
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The photomanipulations on the cards are nice, richly colored and detailed to mimic visionary art, though some are silly. The first card, "The Ancient Ones," is obviously a modern portrait of an elderly Western woman, in a collared shirt and nice earr ...more
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Blue Bird Lenormand by Stuart Kaplan
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What a sweet little deck! It comes simply packaged in an unassuming playing card style box, with a short guidebook whose interpretations seem a bit different from, and are likely more true to the origins of Lenormand than, other information I've foun ...more
More of Amy's books…
“Owing to the shape of a bell curve, the education system is geared to the mean. Unfortunately, that kind of education is virtually calculated to bore and alienate gifted minds. But instead of making exceptions where it would do the most good, the educational bureaucracy often prefers not to be bothered.

In my case, for example, much of the schooling to which I was subjected was probably worse than nothing. It consisted not of real education, but of repetition and oppressive socialization (entirely superfluous given the dose of oppression I was getting away from school). Had I been left alone, preferably with access to a good library and a minimal amount of high-quality instruction, I would at least have been free to learn without useless distractions and gratuitous indoctrination. But alas, no such luck.

Let’s try to break the problem down a bit. The education system […] is committed to a warm and fuzzy but scientifically counterfactual form of egalitarianism which attributes all intellectual differences to environmental factors rather than biology, implying that the so-called 'gifted' are just pampered brats who, unless their parents can afford private schooling, should atone for their undeserved good fortune by staying behind and enriching the classroom environments of less privileged students.

This approach may appear admirable, but its effects on our educational and intellectual standards, and all that depends on them, have already proven to be overwhelmingly negative. This clearly betrays an ulterior motive, suggesting that it has more to do with social engineering than education. There is an obvious difference between saying that poor students have all of the human dignity and basic rights of better students, and saying that there are no inherent educationally and socially relevant differences among students. The first statement makes sense, while the second does not.

The gifted population accounts for a very large part of the world’s intellectual resources. As such, they can obviously be put to better use than smoothing the ruffled feathers of average or below-average students and their parents by decorating classroom environments which prevent the gifted from learning at their natural pace. The higher we go on the scale of intellectual brilliance – and we’re not necessarily talking just about IQ – the less support is offered by the education system, yet the more likely are conceptual syntheses and grand intellectual achievements of the kind seldom produced by any group of markedly less intelligent people. In some cases, the education system is discouraging or blocking such achievements, and thus cheating humanity of their benefits.”
Christopher Langan

Ayaan Hirsi Ali
“The only position that leaves me with no cognitive dissonance is atheism. It is not a creed. Death is certain, replacing both the siren-song of Paradise and the dread of Hell. Life on this earth, with all its mystery and beauty and pain, is then to be lived far more intensely: we stumble and get up, we are sad, confident, insecure, feel loneliness and joy and love. There is nothing more; but I want nothing more.”
Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Infidel

Alan W. Watts
“Advice? I don’t have advice. Stop aspiring and start writing. If you’re writing, you’re a writer. Write like you’re a goddamn death row inmate and the governor is out of the country and there’s no chance for a pardon. Write like you’re clinging to the edge of a cliff, white knuckles, on your last breath, and you’ve got just one last thing to say, like you’re a bird flying over us and you can see everything, and please, for God’s sake, tell us something that will save us from ourselves. Take a deep breath and tell us your deepest, darkest secret, so we can wipe our brow and know that we’re not alone. Write like you have a message from the king. Or don’t. Who knows, maybe you’re one of the lucky ones who doesn’t have to.”
Alan Wilson Watts

Kurt Vonnegut
“If you can do no good, at least do no harm.”
Kurt Vonnegut, Slapstick, or Lonesome No More!

Jordan B. Peterson
“There's a class of things to be afraid of: it's "those things that you should be afraid of". Those are the things that go bump in the night, right? You're always exposed to them when you go to horror movies, especially if they're not the gore type of horror movie. They're always hinting at something that's going on outside of your perceptual sphere, and they frighten you because you don't know what's out there. For that the Blair Witch Project was a really good example, because nothing ever happens in that movie but it's frightenting and not gory. It plays on the fact tht you do have a category of Those Things Of Which You Should Be Afraid. So it's a category, frightening things. And only things capable of abstraction can come up with something like the caregory of frightenting things.

And so Kali is like an embodied representation of the category of frightening things. And then you might ask yourself, well once you come up with the concept of the category of frightening things, maybe you can come up with the concept of what to do in the face of frightening things. Which is not the same as "what do you do when you encounter a lion", or "what do you do when you encounter someone angry". It's a meta question, right?

But then you could say, at a philosophical level: "You will encounter elements of the category of all those things which can frighten and undermine you during your life. Is there something that you can do *as a category* that would help you deal with that." And the answer is yeah, there is in fact. And that's what a lot of religious stories and symbolic stories are trying to propose to you, is the solution to that. One is, approach it voluntarily. Carefully, but voluntarily. Don't freeze and run away. Explore, instead. You expose yourself to risk but you gain knowledge.

And you wouldn't have a cortex which, you know, is ridiculously disproportionate, if as a species we hadn't decided that exploration trumps escape or freezing. We explore. That can make you the master of a situation, so you can be the master of something like fire without being terrified of it.

One of the things that the Hindus do in relationship to Kali, is offer sacrifices. So you can say, well why would you offer sacrifices to something you're afraid of. And it's because that is what you do, that's always what you do. You offer up sacrifices to the unknown in the hope that good things will happen to you.

One example is that you're worried about your future. Maybe you're worried about your job, or who you're going to marry, or your family, there's a whole category of things to be worried about, so you're worried about your future. SO what're you doing in university? And the answer is you're sacrificing your free time in the present, to the cosmos so to speak, in the hope that if you offer up that sacrifice properly, the future will smile upon you. And that's one of the fundamental discoveries of the human race. And it's a big deal, that discovery: by changing what you cling to in the present, you can alter the future.”
Jordan B. Peterson

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