Learning to Sing in a Strange Land Learning to Sing in a Strange Land discussion


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Learning to Sing in a Strange Land by Wesley Stevens

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Susan Fenner This book, written by a friend of mine, was published this month (January 2009). I have enormous respect for the author, Wesley Stevens. He and his wife, Marilyn, have done so much to help others and are such wonderful Christians. In my experience, having a loved one incarcerated is very like having a death in the family . . . family members go through the same stages of grief and need the support and love of others to get through it. This book will help families (especially those living in Texas) who are suffering the loss of a loved one to the criminal justice system. If you need this support, please email me at fenner.susan@gmail.com or tifa@tifa.org . All contacts are confidential.


message 2: by Ilze (new)

Ilze ... ok, besides the grief there is the secrecy ... my mother for one didn't want a soul to know about it. Now that I'm an adult and went to the city's archives to find out exactly what happened all those years ago, I understand better. Also done some reading on prison conditions, go to http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42...


Susan Fenner Ilze wrote: "... ok, besides the grief there is the secrecy ... my mother for one didn't want a soul to know about it. Now that I'm an adult and went to the city's archives to find out exactly what happened all..."

Exactly! We (in TIFA) are trying to encourage people to not be ashamed . . . after all, the family member did not do the crime . . . the inmate made some bad choices. There are at least two reasons that I am very open about my son. #1 ANYTHING that I have to keep secret has WAY too much power over me. #2 For the stigma surrounding having a loved one incarcerated to go away, people have to see that there are many wonderful, law abiding folks who have a relative who made a mistake and is incarcerated. The idea that inmates' families must all be the dregs of society is ridiculous. Many felons had loving homes with parents who taught them right from wrong . . . they just chose to do the wrong thing. Haven't we all, at some point in our lives, made mistakes that could have been costly? I do understand that there are reasons that people keep things a secret. I just believe that if they can be open about it, it will be a positive, liberating experience.


message 4: by Ilze (new)

Ilze Have you seen some of Frank Warren's work? He's making a living out of people's secrets - and many of them don't know how powerful and incapacitating those secrets are.


Susan Fenner Ilze wrote: "Have you seen some of Frank Warren's work? He's making a living out of people's secrets - and many of them don't know how powerful and incapacitating those secrets are."

No, but I'll look him up. I wish I had more time to read, but for important books I just make time. Thank you for your interest and your posts.


Susan Fenner Susan wrote: "Ilze wrote: "Have you seen some of Frank Warren's work? He's making a living out of people's secrets - and many of them don't know how powerful and incapacitating those secrets are."

No, but I'll ..."


Oh! Yes, I heard of him. Fascinating!


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